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Your Career: When Is The Right Time In Your Career To Have A Baby?…Whoever You are, you Need to Simply Identify What you Want & Turn Off the Noise. You. Do. You.

It was September 2002. I was sitting in my one-bedroom apartment which bordered the Long Island Railroad tracks, holding the positive pregnancy test in my hand. I was a top-selling salesperson, early in my career at twenty-five years old. I also knew that my marriage was in deep trouble and that, more likely than not, I would be having this baby on my own.

Mother

I took a breath and weighed my options, thought about the impact of having a child on my career and my life, and went for it. Charlotte was born in May 2003. I took six weeks of maternity leave. I leaned in, experienced success in my career, and loved being a motherbut boy, was it challenging.

It was December 2006. I was newly remarried and had just left my full-time sales management job to start a consulting gig which would one day turn intoLikeable Media. Feeling on top of my game, I was thrilled to see another positive test. Kate was born in July 2007. I took a year off, consulting clients from home, watching The View, and slowing down, allowing my husband to step up and run my consulting business, which he then grew at light speed. Call it leaning out or taking a breather—whatever it was, it was pretty awesome. Then I came back to help take us over the finish line.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Now, here I sit in November 2014. After many failed attempts to get and stay pregnant, we got the great news that a baby boy will be coming in April 2015. I’m currently the CEO of Likeable Media (Dave has moved on to launch a tech startup) and Likeable is bigger than ever.

In some ways, it’s easier this time around, since I have the talent in-house to help when I’m out. In other ways, as a leader, I feel tremendous pressure to jump right back in—to push forward like I never have before. I love my company, but I also feel like I’ve earned the right to spend some extra time snuggling my last baby if I so choose. For the first time in my life, I have absolutely no idea what I’m going to do!

One of the benefits of entrepreneurship is flexibility; you don’t have to answer to anyone if you want to take time away. But of course, the beauty of not having a boss is contradicted by being entirely in control of your income; if you slow down, often enough, so does your bank account. And for most women who aren’t entrepreneurs, the choice about the “right” time to have a baby (or whether or not to have a baby at all!) is one that can weigh quite heavily on them.

It you want to depress yourself, take a look at the data. The data shows that men make more money after having children, and women actually make less. This is especially true for women who are low-income. In fact, when looking at a report from think tank Third Way, while high-income men get the biggest pay bump for having a family, low-income women suffer the most.  And check this out: While never-married women have almost closed the wage gap at 96%, the stats were far different for married women and particularly those with children, with stats ranging from 77-83% of their male counterparts’ pay. A Stanford study that sent out resumes with the exact same credentials but added PTA Association for a control group, found that mothers were about half as likely to be called back.

Are you depressed yet? Now, just search for some advice on this topic, and you’ll find that there’s no shortage. The Princeton Mom will tell us to find a man in college and to get procreating. Sheryl Sandberg will tell you to lean in to get a seat at the table first. Sheryl Sandberg haters will tell you that it’s all bull and that you will hate yourself when you lean in—you must recline! And then there’s Arianna Huffington, who after selling Huffington Post for over 315 million dollars, wants to teach women not to work so hard—they should meditate and thrive! We are absolutely inundated with people telling us what to do. There’s no consensus, and we’re left feeling utterly confused.

A while back, I jumped into the advice party when I wrote an article titled, “Women, Watch Out For Your Number One Enemy.” In it, I talked about how an author criticized the maternity leave choice of Marissa Mayer, calling her piece, “Why I Feel Sorry For Marissa Mayer’s Baby.” I urged women to adopt the concept of “You Do You,” making the choices that resonate with you and for you—and no one else. The advice was basically: Stop taking advice and learn to listen to yourself.

There is no magic bullet answer to the right time to have a child. There are many factors of course, including your partner, your career, and your finances. In speaking from experience, I can tell you that having babies was the best, and the hardest, thing I ever did. It wasn’t always rational (many disagreed with my choices), and it wasn’t always best for my career, but for me personally, it was always worth it.

But ultimately, there is no right time or wrong time. There is only your time. Whether you are Rachel Sklar, founder of the Li.st, who is single and having a baby at 41, whether you are Melanie Notkin, who has embraced and become a champion for finding a new kind of happiness with Otherhood, or whether you are Carrie Kerpen, having a baby at each and every life stage of her career and simply going with her gut. Whoever you are, you need to simply identify what you want and turn off the noise. You. Do. You.

 

Forbes.com  |  November 4, 2014  |  Carrie Kerpen

Seeking a Position With a Disability ?…The Best Jobs For People With Disabilities

Seeking a position with a Disability ?  These are your eight (8) professional positions you can pursue.

Disability Person

1- Accountant

Accountant

Average annual salary: $64,000
Projected growth by 2020: 13%

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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2- Computer Support Specialist

Computer Support Specialist

Average annual salary: $49,000
Projected growth by 2020: 17%

 

3- Management Consultant

Management Consultant

Average annual salary: $79,000
Projected growth by 2020: 19%

 

4- Market Research Analyst

Market Research Analyst

Average annual salary: $60,000
Projected growth by 2020: 32%

 

5- Pharmaceutical Sales

Pharmaceutical Sales

Average annual salary: $58,000
Projected growth by 2020: 9%

 

6- Physician Assistant

Physician Assistant

Average annual salary: $91,000
Projected growth by 2020: 38%

 

7- Statistician

Statistician

Average annual salary: $76,000
Projected growth by 2020: 27%

 

8- Vocational counselor

Vocational counselor

Average annual salary: $54,000
Projected growth by 2020: 12%

 

Forbes.com  | November 4, 2014  |  Susan Adams

http://www.forbes.com/pictures/mkl45ehfkl/accountant-2/

Leadership: ‘Nice Girls Don’t Negotiate’: Why There’s Still a Pay Gap…Don’t Ask, Don’t Get. It’s Because Women are Bad at Asking for What They Want.

Mary Barra, CEO at GM; Virginia Rometty, CEO at IBM, Banco Santander’s  Chairman & CEO Ana Botin. Women are moving into the executive suite at a fast clip these days.

English: Ginni Rometty of IBM in 2011 during &...

“Nice girls don’t negotiate,” says Horatio Falcao, Senior Affiliate Professor at INSEAD, writing in INSEAD Knowledge and referring to what he calls a “negotiation skills gap.”

A survey of women CEOs at 2500 of the world’s largest publicly-traded companies in the last ten years by Strategy& (formerly Booz & Company) shows that in eight of the last ten years there have been more female CEOs entering the global workforce than leaving it.

The study also shows male and female CEOs have similar backgrounds: they are roughly the same age, come from the same region as corporate headquarters, have little international work experience, and only rarely achieve the joint CEO-Chairman title.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Problem is, they are still underpaid: women CEOs on average make 80-cents on the dollar compared to their male counterparts, according to a 2013 survey by the Institute for Women’s Policy research based on US Labor Department statistics. But even that is an improvement: two years ago, women CEOs made 69-cents compared to each dollar made by male CEOs.

This is not to say that the three women mentioned above are doing less well than their male counterparts – the Wall Street Journal’s compensation survey of 300 CEOs of publicly-traded US companies showed that of the 14 female CEOs in the survey, eight earned more and six earned less than the median CEO compensation package of $11.4-million last year.  Nevertheless, the pay gap exists. Why?

 

Don’t Ask, Don’t Get

One Behavioral Science professor says it’s because women are bad at asking for what they want. “Nice girls don’t negotiate,” says Horatio Falcao, Senior Affiliate Professor at INSEAD, writing in INSEAD Knowledge and referring to what he calls a “negotiation skills gap.”

Falcao claims that despite advances in the workforce and in policies towards workingwomen, gender biases still exist that create a negotiating environment emphasizing women’s weaknesses and underscore gender-specific social and psychological barriers during negotiations.

“Men have never had to reckon with gender bias,” points out Falcao in his research. “There is a social stigma against women who ask for more.” Women are still expected to be nice, sweet, and friendly; asking for more money or better conditions shoves them into the harsh, unfriendly zone.

Women are further hampered, claims Falcao, by what he calls their “tendency to expect certain levels of fairness in life which are not applicable in the workforce.” They may not challenge or question an offer, or even seek to renegotiate their careers, he adds.  In addition, women may seek advice from their networks – which tend to be female-dominated and thus low-ball oriented.

Three Negotiating Rules

Falcao offers three key solutions to overcoming the negotiations gap…and the pay gap:

  1. Reduce Uncertainty – research the company and the sector to create an overview that includes what others in similar positions have made, Get outside opinions…from men as well as women.
  2. Play to Your Strengths – women tend to do better when they negotiate on someone else’s behalf according to research by Hannah Riley Bowles, Linda Babcock, and Kathleen McGinn.   Female strengths, Falcao claims, are their tendency to be curious about things, which can be used during negotiations to create a give-and-take rather than a confrontational atmosphere, which in turn can create an environment more conducive to asking for that raise.
  3. Manage All Labels – get beyond the gender issue quickly by making a point of your expertise, professional abilities and credentials, so employers see you as “more than juts a woman,” Falcao admonishes.

Another study  - by BIAC (Business and Industry Advisory Committee to the OECD), published in June, found that the greatest catalysts for changing women’s status in the workplace – including female CEO pay – come from within: the CEO himself, senior managers and the Board of Directors.

Whether because of quotas, or a real lessening of gender bias and an increase in meritocracy as recruiting tool, it’s a safe bet that we will be seeing a steady increase in the number of women in the executive suite. Indeed, the Strategy& study predicts that  – based upon trends extrapolated from their decade’s worth of data – by 2040, more than 1/3 of all CEOs will be women.

This increase comes at a time when CEO compensation is already under scrutiny by shareholders, stakeholders and the general public. At the same time, this increased scrutiny is revealing publicly the deficit of women at the top, and the discrepancy in compensation.  Can equalization of positions and pay be very far behind?

 

Forbes.com  |  October 30, 2014  |  Shellie Karabell

http://www.forbes.com/sites/shelliekarabell/2014/10/30/nice-girls-dont-negotiate-why-theres-still-a-pay-gap/2/

Your Career: 5 Of The Worst Career Mistakes You Can Make…No Matter How Secure you Feel in Your Current Position, You Should Never Become Too Comfortable

No matter how secure you feel in your current position, you should never become too comfortable. Things happen: Companies get bought out, some go bankrupt, ownership changes, operations are moved to another country. Or you might simply decide that it's time to move on to greener pastures.

Change

If you want to have the best career track possible and be able to find a new job quickly when or if the time comes, avoid making these five potentially disastrous career mistakes.

1. Burning bridges

Just one unprofessional, disrespectful moment could ruin a career opportunity such as a promotion or new job. A burned bridge is the loss of a potential opportunity. Always treat others with respect and be professional — and stop the gossip chain — whether it is with your peers, the boss, clients, or customers. This applies to social media too. Remember that others will be able to view inappropriate pictures and language use and hit the button labeled Share.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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2. Not learning and challenging yourself

If you fall behind the times in knowledge and technology, and stubbornly continue down the old-trusted-ways road, your skills will eventually become out of date or completely obsolete. Instead, continue to learn everything you can about your field, and challenge yourself to take on new projects. Keep up with technology's lightning-fast progress, and keep up with the latest best practices in your field of work.

3. Tossing your résumé aside

So often when we land that great job, the résumé is the first thing to bite the dust in the back of our desk. When the time comes for a job change of any kind, it becomes a very difficult task to polish up the résumé quickly, to remember all the things you have accomplished if you haven't kept a good record. Many people now use LinkedIn or similar sites for keeping an up-to-date record of their positions, progress, achievements, education, and awards. These sites are easy to bring up for your boss to view when asking for a raise or promotion, and they are a great place for a company interested in you to check you out. Keep your résumé current — in an online site or a PDF — and watch the typos and grammatical issues — too many can be a deal killer.

4. Not networking and exploring possibilities

If time and time again you turn down opportunities to attend industry or company events, you are isolating yourself. If you aren't networking and building a base of contacts, how do you expect anyone to know who you are? Be sociable, and meet as many people within your industry and company as possible — there are many people who receive job offers because of whom they know and not necessarily because of what they know. You can also greatly benefit from exploring the possibilities in the job market — find out what other people are doing and how much money they are making in a position similar to yours. Keeping up on current trends within your field will give you bargaining power as well.

5. Not giving it your all

Completing the bare minimum requirement of work each day, not going above and beyond to help your company or a customer, or not playing nicely on a team is sending the message out to the world — people talk — that you really don't care or are just plain lazy. Make this mistake on an ongoing basis and it could ruin your chance for a stellar career. Here's the bottom line: Be the best you as often as you can, and don't be afraid to take on new challenges or opportunities.

 

Businessinsider.com  |  November 1, 2014  |  Peter Economy 

 http://www.inc.com/peter-economy/5-career-mistakes-you-should-never-make.html#ixzz3Hv3uhhbz

Your Career: The 50 Best Internships For 2015…Internship Season Just Ended, but Savvy Students are Already Thinking about their Plans for Next Summer.

Internship season just ended — but savvy students are already thinking about their plans for next summer.

College Graduate

That's why career website Vault has already released its ranking of the top internships for 2015.  To compile the list, Vault gathered data from more than 500 organizations that sponsor internships, as well as their interns.

The companies were asked to provide descriptions of their programs and details on the number of interns hired, duration of the program, locations and departments in which interns are placed, and application requirements.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Vault also asked current and former interns to comment on and rate their experiences on a variety of factors, including the application process, compensation and perks, quality of life, meaningfulness of assignments and training, and full-time employment prospects, on a scale of 1 to 10. These ratings were averaged to determine an overall score for each program.

Vault ranks the top 50, but because there were two ties this year, a total of 52 programs were included in the final list. 

BI_graphics_bestInternships

Businessinsider.com  |  October 31, 2014  |  JACQUELYN SMITH / SKYE GOULD

http://www.businessinsider.com/best-internships-for-2015-2014-10

Your Career: Do You Have What It Takes To Start Over?…I Never Imagined I’d be Doing a 180 at My Age…A Pretty Scary & Exciting Proposition, Isn’t it?

And as the dictionary says: a hundred and eighty degree turn is a reversal of direction; a complete reversal in thinking or behavior. It happened to me, and I just turned 60. It’s a turnaround process I wasn’t expecting to be doing.

Change

And what happened? The dissolution of a relationship and marriage of 30 years; selling the home we lived in, followed by moving into a room, aka sharing a nice home—with the rest of my life in storage. And, within this same time-frame, the firm I worked for was sold. My boss and mentor of 25 years had passed away just before all of this happened. The idea occurred to me that things were not going to get better, so I resigned.

All in all, from what I’ve read, each of these major stress-filled, cataclysmic life events comes in at the top of the charts—and I was dealing with three at the same time.

Doing a 180 comes down to making a key decision: do you remain a bystander as the changes in your life unfold before your very eyes, or do you make decisions and participate? Are you really too old to change, too defeated to act, or too tired to do anything?

Or, are you ready to start over in new ways?

Can you begin to see your friends, your family, and your business associates as your supporters, as well as people who need you as much as you need them? Are you able to walk out the door in the morning and realize it’s not only beautiful outside, but there’s also joy and opportunity almost everywhere you look? I don’t mean to sound overly idealistic. It’s more about waking up and being aware of the present, and asking yourself who you really are.

A pretty scary and exciting proposition, isn’t it?

So what has been happening during this first year? I unloaded a lot of mental and physical baggage. The physical baggage was quite immediate. It’s hard to grasp this until it’s upon you—the house is sold, you’re in escrow, and it’s time to move. Clearing out a house I’d lived in for seventeen years was cathartic. I felt the next step, the next move, would be selecting and fitting “everything I need” into a four-door sedan. Those pieces of art, those photographs, and the beautiful furniture you had made? Well, they wait for you in a storage warehouse until you find the next place that is “yours.”

Then, deciding where you’re going with the four-door sedan after a brief respite in a hotel room with a kitchenette.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Remember: Friends are there. They have great ideas. They care about you and you care about them. A friend knew of someone in the area who was looking for a roommate. Solution!

Talk to your friends, get in touch, and stay in touch with those you care about. They really want you to.

The mental part was a different story… head chatter, insomnia, crying, eating strange things at any and all hours, and trying not to bore family and friends into eternity with re-hashing of what had unraveled.

Until now, these had been givens:

  • I owned a house.
  • The job was challenging, and secure.
  • I would be married the rest of my life, I guess.

With all those pillars of stability collapsed on the ground, how does one heal and carry on? Well, it’s not a new concept: Action.

Initially it doesn’t even matter what kind of action, but remember to take tiny steps at the beginning. Write things down in a journal because it’s time to vent and begin to understand what’s on your mind.

Design what the day can be no matter how mundane—get up, walk, call a friend or colleague, join a networking meeting, clean the closet, walk some more, soak in the bathtub with your iPod, watch a movie that won’t make you cry, put the sheets back on the bed so you can get in it sometime.

Then as time passes day by day, even in the first weeks on your own, you start developing a pattern of activity. Your degraded health, lack of self-esteem, and low energy are now palpable and you recognize them as the valuable challenges and obstacles to overcome. The pain of all the chatter hasn’t subsided yet, but you’re busier, and not the “busy” of being in a rut. It’s that good kind of busy.

As this first year comes full circle, a 360, and I’ve done a 180, my advice to you is you’re stronger than you know. Gain an understanding of what you really like, then build your mind and your body and take those necessary steps. And take time to go outside and walk.

Things start to happen. You get bold and revise your resume, and post it online. You tell friends you did. You don’t know if you’re going to be seen or heard. But you do it every day. You keep walking too. You go out dinner with friends. You go to a matinee. Someone hears about you from a colleague. They want to hire you. You can’t believe it. But you have an interview for the first time in forever, and you get hired.

You like working again, learning new things, getting involved, meeting new people and, you’re still walking every day.

Then something else happens you hadn’t expected. A colleague asks you to take a risk, a new step. How about starting a company? A new business. You’ve always wanted to. How about it?

I could hear myself in the past:

  • I wish I had time.
  • I have a mortgage.
  • I can’t leave my job—can’t leave my boss.

I could hear myself, now:

  • What better time?
  • Living in the present isn’t as great a risk as I once believed.
  • What better way to learn to live and build a life than take this step?

And I’m still walking every day.

So let’s add more to it. Walking wasn’t enough. It was time to go to the gym. At least two times a week, but it quickly turned into six times a week, with a day of rest. A good friend will be there to meet you. Someone you’re counting on, and they’re counting on you.

When you’re my age, or actually any age, you can’t build a business without health. I hadn’t seen that coming either.

As this first year comes full circle, a 360, and I’ve done a 180, my advice to you is you’re stronger than you know. Gain an understanding of what you really like, then build your mind and your body and take those necessary steps. And take time to go outside and walk.

What’s worked for you when you’ve faced challenges? I welcome your comments.

Patti Saunders is San Diego  President SCR –Senior Community Referrals. You can follow her on Twitter @4SrReferrals.

Your Career: 7 Things To Do Right After You’ve Been Fired…Rather Than Sending Out a Blast of Resumes to Any Open Position you Qualify for, you Should Use LinkedIn & Your Own Personal Social Network

Being fired is never fun, but career coach and executive search professional Scott Uhrig says losing your job doesn't have to derail your career.  In fact, many people learn valuable lessons from the experience and come back stronger than ever.

fired-layoffs-let-go-box-leaving-work-3

"If you cast a wide net and consider the most opportunities and you position yourself as a generalist, you optimize your chances of getting a job quickly, but time and time again I see that being the wrong approach," Uhrig says.

Here are seven things you can do to make sure your professional life stays on track after you've lost your job:

1. If it's not too late, try asking your company to give you one last shot.

One thing Uhrig hears a lot from people he works with who are between jobs is that they never truly understood what they were supposed to be doing for the company. If things look ominous but you haven't already been sent packing, you might want to try writing down your job description on a piece of paper and showing it to your boss.

If he or she has had a different idea of what your job entails, perhaps clarifying that discrepancy can ease the tension that had gotten you in hot water in the first place.

"Sometimes that clarification can actually salvage your job and that relationship," Uhrig says.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013.

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2. File for unemployment benefits as soon as you can.

Depending on the circumstances of your dismissal and what state you live in, you could be eligible for unemployment benefits that could help you pay the bills while you're looking for the next gig. Check with your state's labor department to find out whether you qualify.

3. If you can afford to, take time to decompress.

Uhrig says that while it's tempting to get "right back on the horse" and start applying to jobs, it's not a good idea if you're still too bitter about losing your most recent job.

Calling the experience emotionally traumatizing, the careers expert recommends that people who are in a bad place mentally should probably take some time to come to terms with what has happened.

One thing he says is useful is reminding yourself that you are not alone, and even very successful professionals sometimes find themselves out of work.

4. Understand why you've been fired.

One of the most important steps for finding the next job is understanding what went wrong in your last one. Oftentimes, Uhrig says, people lose their jobs because they just weren't a good fit for them.

What he recommends doing is taking stock, quantitatively and unemotionally, of what the company's goals were and where you came up short in trying to achieve them.

Most importantly, he says, people need to "own the failure" by understanding what they personally did wrong and not blaming others for what happened.

5. Learn what you do best.

Once you've figured out the weaknesses that doomed you at your last job, you can start thinking about the strengths that will help you flourish in the near future.

Uhrig recommends asking your friends and former colleagues to tell you three things you do well and three things you do poorly. Ultimately, he says, you'll see a pattern that will give you a good sense of what your best qualities are.

If you have the money, you can also go see a careers coach, who can provide guidance and personality tests that will help you discover where your talents lie.

Once you've determined your strengths, you can brand yourself as an expert in these subjects during your job search, which will give you a leg up over other people who are selling themselves as generalists.

6. Don't just look for any job; look for the right job.

Once you know what you're good at, you can start thinking about what kind of job you'd like to have next. Uhrig recommends pinpointing specific jobs and companies that seem like a good fit and honing in on them.

Rather than sending out a blast of applications to any open position you think you might be qualified for, he says you should use LinkedIn and your own personal social network to find people employed in positions of power at the companies you want to work for.

From there, you can reach out, have coffee, and discuss how you could be of service. Otherwise, you run the risk of getting a new job that is just as bad a fit for you as your old one.

"If you cast a wide net and consider the most opportunities and you position yourself as a generalist, you optimize your chances of getting a job quickly, but time and time again I see that being the wrong approach," Uhrig says.

7. Prepare to talk about being fired.

Once you're at the stage where you're going on job interviews, it's important to come up with a game plan for how you're going to address your gap in employment when it ultimately comes up.

Uhrig recommends being proactive about addressing the elephant in the room. While you probably shouldn't bring up being fired the moment you walk in the door, there will likely be a chance to discuss it sometime in your initial interview.

He says the most important thing is to be honest about what happened because hiring managers will almost definitely know you're lying if you give untruthful answers like, "It was a mutual decision." 

Once you've succinctly described why things didn't work out last job, you can pivot to what you accomplished there and what you will accomplish for a new employer in the future.

If all goes well, you'll be back up on that horse in no time.

 

Businessinsider.com | October 30, 2014  |  

http://www.businessinsider.com/what-to-do-right-after-youve-been-fired-2014-10#ixzz3HdptTLUn

Leadership: Intimidated To Negotiate For Yourself? 5 Critical Strategies To Help You Nail It…When we Look at the Pay Gap or the Lack of Women in Leadership Roles, we can Recognize Why Negotiation is an Important Skill for Women to Possess.

It’s all over the news todaythat women are challenged in negotiating and advocating powerfully for themselves.  

ManagerRespect

In recent research released this week by Citi and LinkedIn LNKD -2.84%, the data reveals that while 30% of women say they regularly share news of their professional accomplishments, only 40% feel they are adequately promoting their work to senior members of their organizations, compared to 50% of men who feel they’re doing a good job of self-promotion. 

And women believe they should be making 27% more than their current salary. Another recent study revealed that 57% of men negotiate their very first salary, versus 7% of women. In my work with over 10,000 professional women, I see this pattern daily of women feeling reluctant and intimidated to negotiate on their own behalf.

To understand how women can learn to negotiate more effectively, I connected with pioneer female sports agent-turned-entrepreneur Molly Fletcher, upon the release of her newest book, A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating.

One of the first women in the sports agent business (and dubbed by CNN as the “female Jerry Maguire”), and founder of her own consulting company, Molly knows all about the gender stereotypes of negotiating. When people weren’t sure of her skill set– she found new ways to relate to, embrace, and ultimately represent top male and female athletes we’ve all watched on television—and she did this through what she attributes as her five steps of negotiating.

I asked Molly to address the key questions I hear from women every day about how to negotiate, and win, and offer some critical strategies to enhance our negotiation power.

Molly shares this:

Research shows that women overwhelmingly tend to be more hesitant when negotiating on behalf of themselves– accepting lower pay, agreeing to take on more, and negotiating at much lower rates than their male counterparts.  Here are five key strategies that will help you communicate and negotiate with more authority and confidence:

1. Take intimidation out of the equation.

One of my motivations for writing A Winner’s Guide to Negotiating: How Conversation Gets Deals Done was to take the intimidation factor out of negotiation.  In a recent salary.com survey, 59% of respondents said they dread salary negotiations because it makes them feel nervous and/or apprehensive.  It is for most people, a very uncomfortable position.  A few tactics:

- Preparation is key. It seems obvious, but almost 90% of negotiators fail to ask basic diagnostic questions when entering a negotiation.  Preparation is a huge part of being able to ask with confidence.  That means not just arming yourself with hard data, but also having 360-degree awareness and understanding the values, goals, hopes and fears of the other side.  Being prepared will help you anticipate the inevitable ebbs and flows of a negotiation and help you drive a more compelling case.

- Practice in low stakes scenarios People tend to think negotiating is a skill you either have or don’t have, instead of a skill that can be developed with practice.  Don’t make that big negotiation you have coming up be the only time you practice.  Find low stakes situations where you can practice your negotiating skills and build confidence.

- Negotiation is just a conversation. If you can frame up negotiation as an ongoing conversation and not a one-time battle, you will diminish some of the fear.  Remember that not every negotiation has to happen all at once.  Take the time to set the stage and find common ground.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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2. Embrace the power of the pause.

The key here is to embracing the silence in negotiations, and learn when to keep quiet.  I call this “Embracing the Pause” and it’s one of the most difficult parts of negotiation.  As a general rule, the most powerful time to embrace the pause is after you make your ask.  We have a tendency to be really uncomfortable with silence because it signals a level of ambiguity we aren’t accustomed to.  Very rarely does everything happen at once in a negotiation.  If you can learn to embrace the pause effectively, it’s a really powerful tactic in negotiation.  It can accomplish a number of important outcomes:

- Projects confidence in your position.

- Limits emotionality, which often destroys negotiations.

- Creates anticipation and possibilities.

- Allows you to capture data based on how the other side responds within the pause.

- Adds perspective by allowing you to come out of the negotiation to take a high-level viewpoint.

 

3. Negotiate for the top.
Women negotiate at a much lower rate than men, and when they do negotiate, often settle for less. There are many factors that play into this gender discrepancy, including the very real “social cost” of negotiation for women. I think the first part of negotiating stronger has to come from a real understanding of why it’s important. When women don’t negotiate, they lose out on more than just money. They also lose out on career opportunities, exposure within a company, promotions, additional training, and opportunities for growth.

When we look at the pay gap or the lack of women in leadership roles, we can recognize why negotiation is an important skill for women to possess.  So I think it starts there, with understanding that negotiation is going to have to be part of that conversation and creating change.

The social cost of negotiation does have an impact in how women negotiate.  I think as women, we have to be extremely over prepared.  We also have to be more intentional about framing up negotiation as for the benefit of “we” instead of “me.”  That’s good advice for anyone, but women in particular have to be more conscious of it.

4. Leverage your authentic assets.

I try to avoid over-generalizations about gender because I think most of my advice can go towards both men and women.  The biggest takeaway is to be authentic.  Women especially feel pressured to have to adapt a certain personality when negotiating, and you see it with men sometimes as well.  There is a stereotype that negotiators have to be tough and aggressive, which carries over into an adversarial, hardline approach to negotiation.  I think it’s much more important to be authentic and play to your strengths.

5. Be as fluid and flexible as possible.

As a sports agent, I never know exactly when or where a deal is going to get done.  There is a gross misperception that every deal gets done in a boardroom after a formal meeting and is closed with a handshake.  That’s not the way it works. Usually it is much more fluid than that so you always have to be ready when the opportunity arises.

As the mom of three daughters, I’ve been in some pretty interesting scenarios as my job has no “off” hours.  I can remember negotiating the final stages of PGA TOUR golfer Matt Kuchar’s deal with Bridgestone.  I knew we were close to a deal, but I wasn’t entirely sure when it would get done.  We had discussed logo placements, bonuses, the number of tournaments required for full fair pay—all the groundwork to get the deal done.

I escaped out of the office to spend some time with my daughters who were 5 and 6 at the time.  We set up a mean hopscotch course, and I was in “mommy mode.”  At about 7 pm, the phone rang and it was my primary contact Daryl from Bridgestone.  I instantly have to switch modes mentally to get the deal.  I took the phone call and we were able to finalize details and lock in a deal in only minutes.  And I only had to miss one round of hopscotch!

Negotiation is fluid like that.  You always have to be extremely prepared, open and ready to find a solution, whenever the exciting chance emerges.

One final question I was curious to ask Molly:

Kathy: Molly, we’ve heard from experts like Victoria Medvec, the executive director of the Center for Executive Women at the Kellogg School of Management say (in a panel discussion at the 2014 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit), “You never ask for more money. You ask for more of a package.” Would you advise that women should always ask frame the “ask” in terms of a full compensation package, rather than just a raise?

Molly: I agree with that advice up to a certain point.  Yes, regardless of gender, it is always more productive to frame up negotiation from a holistic point of view.  You need to take the time to understand what the company values and determine how you contribute to that.  However, the viewpoint of compensation as the “caboose… along for the ride” is a slippery slope.  In many ways, it goes right back to reinforcing Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella’s original comments that you can count on “karma” to get you that pay raise.  Too many women already think this way.  We should be teaching women how to have these conversations and negotiate more effectively.  Sometimes it is about a “package” but other times it’s truly about a pay raise, and that’s perfectly OK.

For more about Molly Fletcher, visit www.mollyfletcher.com and her new bookA Winner’s Guide to Negotiating.

(To create more reward and satisfaction in your career, visitkathycaprino.com and download her free class The Inner Game of Career Success.)

 

Forbes.com  |  October 29, 2014  |  Kathy Caprino

http://www.forbes.com/sites/kathycaprino/2014/10/29/intimidated-to-negotiate-for-yourself-5-critical-strategies-to-help-you-nail-it/4/

 

Your Career: 5 Ways To Get The Job — Even If You’re Not The Most Qualified Candidate…If you Have a Tendency to Undersell Yourself, Remember This: You Don’t Always Have to Be the Best to Win

As a job seeker, you'll always have competition — and you may not be the "best" or most qualified candidate for the job. But that doesn't mean you can't get it.

Career Fair

Never underestimate the power of a career fair.

No one knows this better than Nishant Bhajaria, a career coach and product manager at Nike.

Bhajaria landed his first job by going to a career fair in college — one his friends deemed not worth attending — and inquiring about a random financial analyst position, even though he was a computer science major. He thought he might be a good fit anyway, and ended up tweaking the job title and description with the hiring manager.

"At a career fair that allegedly would have no opportunities for me, I walked out with a same-day interview and a job offer for a position whose description I co-wrote," he says in a recent LinkedIn post.

From his experience, Bhajaria discovered several hidden nuances to job searching. Most importantly: you don't have to be the perfect candidate.

Here are five of his biggest lessons about how to get the job, even if you're not the most qualified person out there:

Don't get hung up on job titles. 

"Job titles are like Madison Square Garden," Bhajaria says. "The iconic New York venue is neither square nor a garden." The same holds true for several jobs as well. Just because a position doesn't have your ideal title doesn't mean you shouldn't look into it. Dig deeper and ask questions — it might end up being a great fit.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Never stop learning. 

Even if you're under-qualified when you apply for the job, remember that you will learn new skills and grow in the role, Bhajaria says. Prove your worth by showing not only how valuable you already are, but how valuable you have the potential to become. 

handshake career fairJustin Sullivan/Getty ImagesIntroduce yourself to as many people as possible.

Introduce yourself to everyone.

It's easy to get caught up in the idea that job searching is all about who you know. However, Bhajaria points out that who you don't know can prove just as important. Even if you're nervous or uncomfortable, introduce yourself to anyone and everyone — you'll impress people and give them reason to remember you. "By asking for someone to give you their time, you are showing them respect," Bhajaria explains.

Make yourself visible.

It's impossible to be in a "right place at the right time" situation if you never put yourself out there. You might not think you're the most qualified candidate for a job, but the position's yours if you're the best of who's there, so don't be afraid to apply for anything you have a shot at. "If you have a tendency to undersell yourself, remember this: you don't always have to be the best to win," Bhajaria says. 

Don't give up. 

Job hunting is often tough, exhausting, and discouraging, but a little perseverance goes a long way. If you back off at the first taste of rejection, you greatly reduce your chances of luck working in your favor. "You are the sum total of your efforts, not just one failed interview," Bhajaria reminds us. Keep tweaking your résumé, sending in applications, and going on interviews — your determination will pay off. 

Click here to read the original LinkedIn post.

Want your business advice featured in Instant MBA? Submit your tips to tipoftheday@businessinsider.com. Be sure to include your name, your job title, and a photo of yourself in your email.

 

Businessinsider.com  |  October 29, 2014  |  Emmie Martin 

 http://www.businessinsider.com/get-the-job-even-if-youre-not-the-best-2014-10#ixzz3HYnCta2N

Leadership: Afraid Of Networking? Tips To Make It Fun & Worthwhile.. The Why, Where, & How of Successful Networking !

I admit that I’m one of those people who always felt like running in the opposite direction whenever someone mentioned the word, “networking.” That was mainly because I wasn’t sure where to network or how to even approach the concept of “networking” (as an action verb).

networking

What I found when I finally took action, was that there were an almost unlimited number of places to network. For example:

  • Association meetings: Find and attend local business and professional meetings. You can also attend your city’s chamber of commerce meetings and networking events.
  • Alumni events: Seek out networking events through your college or university’s alumni association.
  • Networking groups: Join groups focused on encouraging networking, such as eWomenNetwork (if you’re female) or Meetup, which helps groups of people with shared interests plan meetings and form offline clubs in their local communities.
  • LinkedIn: You can join groups that are of interest and then look for local networking events.
  • Online research: Use websites such as EventbriteNetParty orFindNetworkingEvents to seek out networking events that match your interests.
  • Join a club/organization: Many organizations offer the chance to meet new people as well as learn new skills while you network, such as Toastmasters.
  • Other resources: Your local library and churches also often provide listings of networking events.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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My next challenge was to figure out how to network. My breakthrough came when I realized that I needed to have a clearly defined purpose or reason to network. For example, my purpose might be to network:

  • To find someone who worked at a company where I wanted to work.
  • To find career mentors.
  • To find people willing to tell me about their jobs and what it took to be successful, because they were in jobs that I wanted in the near future.

Finally, I realized that I couldn’t just show up at an event; I had to actively circulate through the attendees and proactively strike up conversations. I’m an introvert so this wasn’t always easy for me, but it helped me improve my communication skills and gave me opportunities to meet some amazing people.

Here are a few of the other networking lessons I learned:

  • Yes, it’s a social event, but treat it as a business event. Act professionally and don’t drink too much alcohol, it it’s offered.
  • Prepare what you’ll discuss. Think about how to introduce yourself to others and how you’ll explain the help you’re seeking – be brief.
  • Move around the event and meet people. Don’t hide out in a corner talking with only a few people – push yourself.
  • Be a good listener – don’t just focus on your own agenda/purpose.
  • Don’t forget to bring business cards.
  • Smile! It will help you look approachable and open to discussion.

~ Lisa Quastauthor of the recently released book, Secrets of a Hiring Manager Turned Career Coach: A Foolproof Guide to Getting the Job You Want. Every Time.   Join me on Twitter @careerwomaninc

 

Forbes.com |  October 27, 2014  |  Lisa Quast