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Got Kids?? : Career Advice No One Told You, & That You Might Not Want To Hear… Great Read for all !

Are you a recent college or high school graduate? As your last summer of freedom is coming to an end and you are about to join the ranks of the office workers, I’ll bet you’ve been receiving a lot of career advice from your family and friends. All well intentioned, I’m sure.

College Graduate

Being arrogant is the fastest way to grind your career to a halt. Want to get promoted? Want to climb the career ladder into management and then executive-level positions? Then learn how to play nice with others. That’s right – learn to flex your style so you can get along with any personality type.

So I’m going to give you some career advice that, most likely, no one has told you yet – and that you might not want to hear. But if your goal is to climb the career ladder, then you should read my comments…

Your career is YOUR responsibility. That’s right, YOUR responsibility. Not your manager’s responsibility. Not HR’s responsibility. And certainly not your college’s responsibility (or your parent’s). Being successful means you need to treat your career like a business and treat yourself like a product that you work on improving, year after year. Define your career aspirations and then create a career development plan that you update on an annual basis.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

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You can’t do mediocre work – your work must be exemplary. Doing so-so work won’t get you noticed. If you want to stand out and get promoted, then you need to do outstanding work that will get you seen by management. Look for ways you can go above and beyond the daily requirements to demonstrate how you add value to the organization.

You need to become an expert in something. People turn to the experts when there are challenges and to solve problems. Look for areas in your business where you can put your skills to use and become an expert. Then, volunteer for projects that will allow you to use these skills and show them off.

You’ll never love 100% of your job – and that’s okay. Many young people finish high school or college and wrongly assume that they’ll love every aspect of every job they’ll ever have. The truth is… that isn’t going to happen. Literally no one loves every part of his or her job. That’s okay. The trick is to figure out the parts you love and the parts that you don’t like that much, and then come up with ways you can make the icky parts more fun.

You must continuously prove that you are an asset to the organization. So you did a great job finishing a project on time and under budget. Good for you. Now, you have to do it all over again. Don’t expect to skate by on good past performance. Every day when you get up and go into work, you must be able to prove your value to the company.

Career sponsors are more important than career mentors. Career mentors can be amazingly helpful. So find career mentors who can teach you skills in areas that you’re lacking. But what’s even more priceless, is finding a career sponsor who will look out for your best interests and help you fast-track your career.

Being arrogant is the fastest way to grind your career to a halt. Want to get promoted? Want to climb the career ladder into management and then executive-level positions? Then learn how to play nice with others. That’s right – learn to flex your style so you can get along with any personality type.

Forbes.com  |  September 8, 2014  |  Lisa Quast 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaquast/2014/09/08/career-advice-no-one-told-you-and-that-you-might-not-want-to-hear/

11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job…The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

No one who has been unemployed expects it to last very long. The reality is that you will be looking for work longer than you want. You can't control the fact that it is taking an average of 24.9 working days to fill a position, according to Dice Holdings August hiring report. However, you can control what you are doing to be more effective in your approach to job searching.

 networking

1. Nail down the basics. 

The people you know want to help you — they just don't know how. The best thing you can do to help them help you is to provide three pieces of vital data. First, Second, know which companies you want to work for. (In other words, perfect your elevator pitch.)

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

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2. Reach out. 

Be purposeful in your outreach. Create a list of everyone you know and systematically contact people on your list to ask for help and advice. Sending out a blanket email won't generate the type of response you are looking for. Your contacts want to help, but an impersonal plea for help falls lower on the list of priorities. Personalize your outreach one email or phone call at a time.

3. Get connected. 

Volunteer, and join professional associations and networking groups for job seekers. Connecting with unemployed and employed professionals helps you stay active and engaged in what's happening in your community and in your field of work. When you volunteer, you are actually killing two birds with one stone. First, it provides you with a feeling of value and worth to help others. Second, you will be interacting with like-minded volunteers and group leaders who can become networking resources.

woman laptop

Flickr / David Goehring

It's time to take advantage of your LinkedIn network.

 

4. Connect online. 

Before you begin connecting with people on LinkedIn, be sure your profile is up to date. Once you've done this, begin connecting with new contacts, as well as past colleagues, friends and others you know. Your LinkedIn network should represent your real-life network, so start building it. Learn how to use LinkedIn to stay in touch with your network, and mine it for valuable data.

5. Polish your résumé. 

This is 2014, and résumé rules have changed since you last updated your document. Do your research and consult expert resources. Once you have created a résumé that positions you as a fit for the perfect job, begin using it. Be sure to adapt it for every job you apply for. How do you know if it's working? If you are applying for jobs, and your phone is ringing off the hook, don't change a thing. Otherwise, go back to the drawing board. Share it with trusted colleagues, and ask for feedback. One word of caution: Everyone has an opinion about résumés, and the recommendations will sometimes contradict one another.

6. Take care of you. 

As the flight attendants say, "Put your oxygen mask on first so you can better assist those around you." This means you should eat well, exercise, and spend time doing the things you enjoy.

7. Consider plan B. 

Don't wait until your unemployment or severance runs out to begin creating a backup plan. Start today. What will you do when you are one month away from the end of your unemployment? How will you generate income? Will you take a temp job or work in retail? Would you be willing to take a job outside your current city? Or would you consider starting your own business? It is never too early to begin actively pursuing your plan B options.

talking women friends

pedrosimoes7 via flickr

Employ a friend to hold you accountable.

 

8. Find someone to hold you accountable. 

You will become discouragedthat is just part of the process. You will need the support of someone who can give you a kick in the pants and who will listen to you objectively. Of all the actions mentioned, this may be the most important. When you identify and use an accountability partner, you feel rejuvenated and regain your momentum. You also have an external source of motivation and a fresh perspective to draw from.

9. Keep an open mind. 

This isn't the same as being open to any opportunities. You should stay focused on the type of job you want. Keeping an open mind means you listen without judgment and don't make assumptions. If a past colleague presents you with a job opportunity you don't think is a fit, don't shut them down. Ask questions, and understand why they are making this recommendation. Likewise, if someone you know suggests you should speak with one a contact, ask why and how you both would benefit from meeting.

10. Move with a sense of urgency. 

Each day you are unemployed, it becomes more difficult to feel secure in your abilities. Rejection and dead ends have a way of eroding your self-confidence. The best cure for these feelings is to do something — anything — that makes you feel productive and successful. Focus on the small wins, such as getting an email response, finding a contact name inside a company you want to work for and attending a networking meeting.

11. And remember the other stuff. 

The list of things to do while job searching is endless. You need to develop relationships with recruiters, find the right job boards for the type of work you are looking for, write solid cover letters and thank-you notes, master the art of small talk, and thousands of other things that will push you outside your comfort zone. Take a deep breath, and mentally prepare for this marathon.

This article originally appeared at U.S. News & World Report. Copyright 2014. Follow U.S. News & World Report on Twitter.

Businessinsider.com  |  August 28, 2014  |  HANNAH MORGANU.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2014/08/27/11-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed#ixzz3BsCxjypx

8 Surprising Rules That Will Get You The Job.. Rule #8: Avoid headhunters. Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs.

At 76 years old, Bill Ellermeyer is an elder statesman of the job search world. He founded an Irvine, CA outplacement firm in 1981, which he sold to staffing firm Adecco in 1990, then ran that office as a division of Adecco subsidiary Lee Hecht Harrison until going out on his own as an independent coach in 2004. He specializes in what he calls “career transitions” for people who have lost their jobs at the executive level, mostly from the c-suite or as vice presidents.

Let the sun in to get started on the right foot.

Some of his clients have been out of work for more than a year when they come to him. He pushes them until they find a new position. After three decades in the career coaching business, he’s come up with eight rules, some counter-intuitive, that he says promise to land his clients a job.

1. Stop looking for a job. 

Too many unemployed people equate looking for a job with sending out a résumé or answering an ad on a job board. “If you send out 500 résumés to friends, family and companies, nobody is going to take the time to help you,” he says. The only time you should send a résumé is when you’ve established there is a real job at a company for which you’re being considered, or a headhunter is trying to fill an open position and requests one. Instead of presenting yourself as an out-of-work job seeker, come across as a resource. Let people know you can solve problems. Approach your job hunt as a search for quality relationships. Instead hand out business cards that portray you as a consultant.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

 

 Continue with article: 

2. Stop working on your résumé.
Important: You need to have a printed résumé but increasing numbers of employers prefer to just look at your LindedIn profile. Also many companies just want the basic facts about your career, rather than a long, carefully crafted story about you in the form of a C.V. I’m not sure I agree with Ellermeyer on this point, but I like his basic advice: Your résumé should be clean, clear, simple and no more than two pages. It makes sense to update it when you’ve made a major accomplishment, like increasing sales by 75% in your department or in journalism, writing a cover story. But you should be able to make those fixes in a few minutes. Do keep your LinkedIn LNKD +1.29% profile up to date.

3. Hold your elevator speech.
“After 20 seconds, no one can remember your elevator speech,” contends Ellermeyer. Instead, he recommends telling a story about yourself that runs for 60-90 seconds. “People remember stories,” he says. “Nobody wants to hear facts and figures.” You should come up with a short, possibly humorous moniker for yourself. Ellermeyer calls himself a “connector.” One of his clients branded himself “rent-a-CFO,” and then told a story about how he had gone from project to project over the last year, and how he had found success at each job. Other possible short-hand titles: IT Problem-Solver, Deal Finder, Resource Solution-Finder.

4. Don’t talk about yourself. 
Instead of leading a conversation with the latest news about your life, says Ellermeyer, “find out how you can serve other people.” Be inquisitive about others and when you learn about them, try to suggest a book or article they may want to read or an event they might want to attend. Many people think that networking requires that they list their accomplishments. But it can be much more effective to ask others about their interests and needs.

5. Don’t go to networking events.
Instead try hosting them yourself. Form your own breakfast group of eight or ten people. In other words, create your own network with people you hand-select. Though it’s tempting to sit at your computer and meet virtually, make the effort to get together face-to-face.

6. Take breaks.
The job search process can make us pretty emotional, especially when you go on the fifth interview and then you’re told that the firm has hired someone else. “Don’t take your downers to the outside world,” advises Ellermeyer. If you’re having a bad day, do research or catch up on email. I agree with this piece of advice but I also have to acknowledge that it can be awfully tough to keep your spirits up if you’ve been job hunting for a long time with no success. A single day off may help but you might need to seek more support from family and friends.

7. Don’t say you’re unemployed.
Instead of presenting yourself as an out-of-work executive, hand over a business card. Remember, you’re not out of work. You’re just between jobs.

8. Avoid headhunters.
Important: Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs. Also, they’re working for companies and not for you. After you’ve made sure your résumé is in their database, move on.

 

Forbes.com  |  August 27, 2014  |  Susan Adams

http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2014/08/27/eight-surprising-rules-that-will-get-you-the-job-2/

Career: How To Find Your Hiring Manager Using LinkedIn…Black Hole recruiting is going the way of the dinosaur

You can lob resumes and application forms into the Black Hole recruiting portals all day long, and it won’t move your job search forward. If there’s one thing job-seekers know, it’s that trying to get a job through the talent-repelling Applicant Tracking Systems most organizations now employ is a total waste of time.

LinkedIn Advantage

It’s worse than a waste of time – it wastes your energy. You’re better off putting a stack of paper resumes on the passenger seat of your car and driving down the freeway with the window open. One of the resumes from your stack might fly out the window and land on a hiring manager’s desk. Black Hole recruiting is going the way of the dinosaur, but you can’t wait for the smarter, more human recruiting process to arrive. You need a job now! You have to write to your hiring manager directly.

You’re going to send your hiring manager — the person who may become your next boss a letter something like a cover letter, but very different in its composition. It’s called a Pain Letter, because it talks about the pain behind the job ad the thing that’s keeping your hiring manager up at night.

The pain might be unhappy customers. It might be runaway turnover on the staff, or an inventory system that’s so bollixed up no one can tell how much inventory is on the shelves.

If there were no pain, there wouldn’t a job opening. No CFO in his right mind would approve the funds to hire a new staff member  unless something was very broken. That’s good news for you!

You’re going to send your Pain Letter straight through the mail to your hiring manager’s desk, avoiding the Black Hole recruiting portal completely. You’re going to send your Pain Letter in the same envelope with and stapled to yourHuman-Voiced Resume. This means that you’ve got to identify your hiring manager by name, and get his or her street address. The address is easy – it’s the company’s location.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

Continue of article: 

Even if your hiring manager works from home, once you send your Pain Letter and Human-Voiced Resume to the organization’s headquarters or their facility in your town, they’ll route your letter to the correct manager because his or her name will be written front and center on your envelope.

In our research we are able to find the hiring manager’s name about ninety percent of the time. It’s difficult to do when the hiring organization is IBM or some other enormous corporate behemoth where hundreds of people share the same titles. When the organization is even a little bit smaller, it’s fairly easy to find your hiring manager. If you try for a while and can’t find the exact person’s name, go up the organization chart.

Don’t write to the CEO, who has a fearsome administrator ready to throw your carefully-written Pain Letter straight back into the same Black Hole you were trying to avoid. If you can’t find your own hiring manager, write to the head of your function inside your target employer — the CMO, CFO or CTO, for instance.

Here’s how to use LinkedIn to find your hiring manager’s name. Navigate to the Advanced People Search page on LinkedIn. You’ll see a Search bar at the top of most LinkedIn pages. Next to that bar is the word Advanced. Click on that word and it will take you to the Advanced People Search function of  LinkedIn.

On the left side of the Advanced People Search page on LinkedIn you’ll see search options including Keyword, First Name, Last Name, and so on. You don’t know your hiring manager’s first name or last name. That’s what we’re trying to find out. You know the company name, so put that into your search, and now start trying job titles.

What will your hiring manager’s title most likely be? If you’re a Purchasing Agent, your hiring manager will be called Materials Manager, Purchasing Manager, Procurement Manager, Supply Chain Manager or Operations Manager. Try all those titles in subsequent searches, and then try the same titles with Director in the place of Manager, and try VP as well if you want to.

Within a half-dozen searches using the employer name and trying out the most likely titles you will find your hiring manager’s name more often than not. If your hiring manager is not a LinkedIn user, don’t fear! We have two more tricks up our sleeve.

Go to the company’s own website and check out their About Us section, looking for Management Bios. If the organization is large enough that your hiring manager isn’t listed on the Management Bios page, his or her manager or boss’s boss will be. That’s the function head we spoke about earlier — the CIO or CHRO, for instance.

You can also search for your hiring manager’s name using Google. Just conduct a Google search  using the company name and each of the titles you imagine that your hiring manager might have. Easy peasy! Anything you can do to get your Human-Voiced Resume and Pain Letter to your hiring manager is worth the time and trouble it takes to do it. The worst thing you can do to your resume is to toss it into the Portal of Doom to sit and dissolve into electrons while somebody else gets the job you’re more than qualified for.

Forbes.com  |  August 20, 2014  |  Liz Ryan

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lizryan/2014/08/20/how-to-find-your-hiring-manager-using-linkedin/

 

15 Highest-Paying Jobs For Professionals With Excellent ‘People Skills’ …Can you get along with almost anyone, anywhere? Do you typically succeed in leadership roles?

Are you a natural negotiator or a superb public speaker? Can you get along with almost anyone, anywhere? Do you typically succeed in leadership roles?   If you said "yes" to any of the above, you may be able to cash in on your natural abilities.

15 Highest Paid Jobs 2014

15 Highest Paid Jobs 2014

According to a new survey by PayScale, there are plenty of lucrative careers for individuals with a strong set of "people skills," which include customer service, human resources, leadership, negotiation, presentation, public speaking, and sales skills, among others.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

 

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To compile its list of the best-paying jobs for employees with this skillset, PayScale found which occupations typically require strong "people skills" — and then ranked them by median pay.

 Businessinsider.com  |  August 20, 2014  |  EMMIE MARTINJACQUELYN SMITH AND SKYE GOULD

 http://www.businessinsider.com/best-paying-jobs-for-workers-with-people-skills-2014-8#ixzz3Awtlyk55

Get ready! ..Holiday Networking Do’s And Don’ts For The Unemployed …Don’t say you’re unemployed. Do mention something you are doing, whether employment-related or not.

The holiday season is a great time to network. Professional associations, companies, personal contacts — all are hosting get-togethers. Typical networking talk revolves around your job. This can be difficult for job seekers, who may get defensive or lose confidence when explaining they’re unemployed.

Christmas_tree_in_marunouchi

Here are 10 do’s and don’ts to navigate this holiday season if you’re unemployed:

1-   Don’t say you’re unemployed. Do mention something you are doing, whether employment-related or not.  There is NOTHING wrong with being unemployed. However, the person you’re speaking with may instantly worry about you. Maybe they have an unemployed family member who is struggling; therefore, they see you as struggling before they even get to know you.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

 

Continue with article: 

2-   Instead, answer the “what do you do” question literally, and tell them about one of your activities. It could be that you’re researching specific companies: Right now, I’m researching middle market companies in the energy space. Yes, you mean job-related research but you don’t need to go into the details in an introduction. Or relay something personal: right now, I have a ton of family visiting so I’m playing tour guide.

 

Crowd of people connected together

3-   Don’t say you’re in transition. Do mention what you’re interested in. “In transition” is just a synonym for unemployed, so it doesn’t necessarily put the other person at ease. Besides, you don’t normally talk about states of being. You wouldn’t say: I’m in debt; I’m in love

 

4-   Instead: People use the phrase “in transition” as an improvement to “unemployed” because it implies movement towards something. You can accomplish the same proactive end by just saying what you’re moving towards:

Other person:  What do you do?

            You: I’m fascinated by what’s happening in oil and gas these days [insert interesting trend here].

 

5-   Don’t say you’re consulting. Be confident that how you’re paid, what you’re paid, or whether you’re paid at all, are not measures of what you contribute.  You wouldn’t introduce yourself as permanent, full-time. Therefore, there is no need to introduce yourself as a consultant or volunteer or freelancer. Some people like to mention consulting or freelance status in case the other person turns out to be looking for a consultant or freelancer. That’s one way to look at it, but that emphasis on pitching to everyone fosters aggressive networking. It’s enough to say what you’re working on, not how you show up on the payroll.

 

6-   Instead: Some people mention consulting status because they feel disingenuous otherwise. This implies consulting or temporary work is a lower status than other work and puts you in a lower status in the conversation. Don’t mention it, and don’t give it a second thought. Your work is significant based on effort, results and attitude, not how you show up on the payroll.

 

7-   Don’t ask for a job lead. Do ask eventually as the relationship develops. A networking interaction is about an introduction to a stranger or a reconnection if it’s someone you met before. A job-related question or request of any kind should wait till you have established rapport and mutual interest.

 

8-   Instead: That said, networking is critical to finding a job so you do want to make requests of your network as warranted. An initial encounter is likely not the place for a job-related request. A better request would be to continue the discussion over coffee or over a call. This way, you keep the actual holiday encounter light and social but open the door for more. If you’re worried about losing momentum, take out your calendar right there and schedule something.

 

9-   Don’t only talk business. Do mix business with pleasure as each relationship dictates.  In the spirit of staying light and social, remember to include personal talk – holiday plans for people you don’t know well; or a walk down memory lane for old connections you are rekindling.

 

10- Instead: As the conversation develops or as the relationship continues over coffee some other day, you don’t have to stay wedded to personal topics. If your old friend is in the energy space, she may be more than willing to help you on that research you’re doing.

 

 

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, career and business expert, writer, speaker and co-founder of SixFigureStart®, coaches people who want to make a change – from one career to a new one; from employee to entrepreneur; from manager to executive. She’s also a stand-up comic, so she’s not your typical coach.

 

 

Forbes.com |  December 4, 2013 | Caroline Ceniza-Levine