11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job…The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

No one who has been unemployed expects it to last very long. The reality is that you will be looking for work longer than you want. You can’t control the fact that it is taking an average of 24.9 working days to fill a position, according to Dice Holdings August hiring report. However, you can control what you are doing to be more effective in your approach to job searching.

 networking 11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job...The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

1. Nail down the basics. 

The people you know want to help you — they just don’t know how. The best thing you can do to help them help you is to provide three pieces of vital data. First, Second, know which companies you want to work for. (In other words, perfect your elevator pitch.)

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin 11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job...The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

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2. Reach out. 

Be purposeful in your outreach. Create a list of everyone you know and systematically contact people on your list to ask for help and advice. Sending out a blanket email won’t generate the type of response you are looking for. Your contacts want to help, but an impersonal plea for help falls lower on the list of priorities. Personalize your outreach one email or phone call at a time.

3. Get connected. 

Volunteer, and join professional associations and networking groups for job seekers. Connecting with unemployed and employed professionals helps you stay active and engaged in what’s happening in your community and in your field of work. When you volunteer, you are actually killing two birds with one stone. First, it provides you with a feeling of value and worth to help others. Second, you will be interacting with like-minded volunteers and group leaders who can become networking resources.

woman laptop 4 11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job...The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

Flickr / David Goehring

It’s time to take advantage of your LinkedIn network.

 

4. Connect online. 

Before you begin connecting with people on LinkedIn, be sure your profile is up to date. Once you’ve done this, begin connecting with new contacts, as well as past colleagues, friends and others you know. Your LinkedIn network should represent your real-life network, so start building it. Learn how to use LinkedIn to stay in touch with your network, and mine it for valuable data.

5. Polish your résumé. 

This is 2014, and résumé rules have changed since you last updated your document. Do your research and consult expert resources. Once you have created a résumé that positions you as a fit for the perfect job, begin using it. Be sure to adapt it for every job you apply for. How do you know if it’s working? If you are applying for jobs, and your phone is ringing off the hook, don’t change a thing. Otherwise, go back to the drawing board. Share it with trusted colleagues, and ask for feedback. One word of caution: Everyone has an opinion about résumés, and the recommendations will sometimes contradict one another.

6. Take care of you. 

As the flight attendants say, “Put your oxygen mask on first so you can better assist those around you.” This means you should eat well, exercise, and spend time doing the things you enjoy.

7. Consider plan B. 

Don’t wait until your unemployment or severance runs out to begin creating a backup plan. Start today. What will you do when you are one month away from the end of your unemployment? How will you generate income? Will you take a temp job or work in retail? Would you be willing to take a job outside your current city? Or would you consider starting your own business? It is never too early to begin actively pursuing your plan B options.

talking women friends 5 11 Things You Should Do When You Lose Your Job...The list of things to do while job searching is endless. Take a deep breath, & mentally prepare for this marathon.

pedrosimoes7 via flickr

Employ a friend to hold you accountable.

 

8. Find someone to hold you accountable. 

You will become discouragedthat is just part of the process. You will need the support of someone who can give you a kick in the pants and who will listen to you objectively. Of all the actions mentioned, this may be the most important. When you identify and use an accountability partner, you feel rejuvenated and regain your momentum. You also have an external source of motivation and a fresh perspective to draw from.

9. Keep an open mind. 

This isn’t the same as being open to any opportunities. You should stay focused on the type of job you want. Keeping an open mind means you listen without judgment and don’t make assumptions. If a past colleague presents you with a job opportunity you don’t think is a fit, don’t shut them down. Ask questions, and understand why they are making this recommendation. Likewise, if someone you know suggests you should speak with one a contact, ask why and how you both would benefit from meeting.

10. Move with a sense of urgency. 

Each day you are unemployed, it becomes more difficult to feel secure in your abilities. Rejection and dead ends have a way of eroding your self-confidence. The best cure for these feelings is to do something — anything — that makes you feel productive and successful. Focus on the small wins, such as getting an email response, finding a contact name inside a company you want to work for and attending a networking meeting.

11. And remember the other stuff. 

The list of things to do while job searching is endless. You need to develop relationships with recruiters, find the right job boards for the type of work you are looking for, write solid cover letters and thank-you notes, master the art of small talk, and thousands of other things that will push you outside your comfort zone. Take a deep breath, and mentally prepare for this marathon.

This article originally appeared at U.S. News & World Report. Copyright 2014. Follow U.S. News & World Report on Twitter.

Businessinsider.com  |  August 28, 2014  |  HANNAH MORGANU.S. NEWS & WORLD REPORT

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2014/08/27/11-tips-for-the-newly-unemployed#ixzz3BsCxjypx

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Strategy : 3 Surprising Skills All Leaders Should Have… Rule #1: Learn to Drive Buses.. Rule #3: Learn to Train Fleas

Question: When is a bird in the hand worth less than two in the bush?  Answer: When a company is more interested in hiring the best person who applies, not the best person available.

square peg Strategy : 3 Surprising Skills All Leaders Should Have... Rule #1: Learn to Drive Buses.. Rule #3: Learn to Train Fleas

Don’t try and fit square pegs into round holes — change the shape of the hole.

I’ve been on a kick of late — about 30 years or so — making the contention that most company leaders inadvertently set up their hiring practices to weed out the weak rather than attract the best. For an entrepreneurial company that wants to grow, this strategy limits how big the company can become.

To overcome the natural tendency to hire for the short term rather than the long term, I suggest company leaders learn how to drive buses, figure out how to put square pegs into round holes, and then find out how to train fleas. These are key leadership traits every company leader should master.

school bus 24 Strategy : 3 Surprising Skills All Leaders Should Have... Rule #1: Learn to Drive Buses.. Rule #3: Learn to Train Fleas

Wikimedia Commons

Great leaders don’t let the candidates get “off the bus” until they’ve found the perfect place for them.

 

1. Learn to drive buses.

Most of us recall Jim Collins’ theme from his bestseller “Good to Great“: “In fact, leaders of companies that go from good to great start not with “where” but with “who.” They start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats.”

Which brings me to my rather superficial Magic Bus Theory of Recruiting. The quick summary goes something like this: Imagine your bus is a big job posting with compelling titles, flashy neon lights, a cool horn, etc. It’s a big bus with enough space for all types of people, although some routes would just be for sales folks, or engineers, or accountants, or whomever. The recruiting idea is to have top people who want to get on the bus and drive it around the city. This is what sourcing passive candidates is all about. Good recruiting is about putting the person in the passenger seat as soon as the person gets on board, with a clever phrase like, “Would you be open to go for a drive if this job represented a true career move?” This is inviting enough for just about everyone to go for the drive.

Once on board you need to conduct a quick screen to see if the person qualifies to be on the bus and possesses the “Achiever Pattern.Once on board you need to conduct a quick screen to see if the person qualifies to be on the bus and possesses theAchiever Pattern. This means the person has accomplished something significant in comparison to his or her peers. If so, describe the job in broad terms, highlighting the employee value proposition and why the job has the potential to represent a significant career move for the right person. Then ask the person to describe a major accomplishment most comparable to your needs. If your job offers some stretch and growth, the person will then begin to sell you as to why he or she is qualified. This is how you put the person in the back seat.

Now you have to find the right seat for the person, but don’t let them off until you get them to the right stop. Unfortunately, most companies have predesigned bus routes and too many filters to even get the right people on the bus in the first place. Worse, it takes an act of God (in this case, the compensation and legal departments) to change bus routes. That’s why we need another leadership lesson.sipaw/Flickr

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin Strategy : 3 Surprising Skills All Leaders Should Have... Rule #1: Learn to Drive Buses.. Rule #3: Learn to Train Fleas

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

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2. Learn to change the shape of round holes.

To get great people onto the bus to begin with, you can’t use job descriptions. That’s why these must be banished as boarding passes. To take this idea one step further, I’m going to suggest that once you have the right person on the bus, create a job that offers the person a true career move, not a lateral transfer. In HR speakdon’t be afraid to modify the job description after you’ve found the person, not before. Rather than try to fit a square peg (the person) into a round hole, modify the shape of the hole (the job requisition).

Now comes the hard part, since you’re already thinking this is not possible. That’s why you first need to understand the nature of fleas.

3. Learn to train fleas.

Zig Ziglar used to tell a story about how fleas can be trained to jump lower (not a typo). Before any training, fleas can naturally jump 20 inches or so unless you put them in a 5-inch mason jar with a lid on top. After 20 minutes or so, the fleas get tired of bumping their heads on the top and “learn” to jump only 4.9 inches. When you take the top off of the jar, none can get out since they’ve mentally put a limit on their jumping ability. The point of this is to suggest that too many leaders sometimes act like trained fleas seeing only the restraints preventing them from implementing change, rather than the opportunity in doing so.

Of course, banishing skills-based job descriptions and writing the job spec after you’ve chosen the person raises legal compliance excuses ( a top labor attorney indicates there are none), impacts the ATS and workflow design, affects recruitment advertising, requires better workforce planning, changes the role of the hiring manager, requires flexible budgeting, and even requires figuring out who should be driving the bus. I call this the hiring Catch-22 which as the video shows is an easy trap to fall into, but not that hard to climb out.

Despite these challenges, the benefits are enormous compared to the issues to be overcome. At a minimum, you’ll hire more talented people, and increase on-the-job performance, job satisfaction and retention. Your new found job design flexibility will allow you to structure work to better meet the needs of a demographically changing workforce, and your hiring productivity will soar by eliminating all of the self-imposed bureaucratic inefficiencies.

Of course, to pull this off you’ll first need to recognize there’s no lid on the jar.


Businessinsider.com  |  August 29, 2014  |  Lou Adler
http://www.inc.com/lou-adler/3-unlikely-skills-that-great-hiring-managers-need-to-possess.html#ixzz3BncEcdfI

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8 Surprising Rules That Will Get You The Job.. Rule #8: Avoid headhunters. Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs.

At 76 years old, Bill Ellermeyer is an elder statesman of the job search world. He founded an Irvine, CA outplacement firm in 1981, which he sold to staffing firm Adecco in 1990, then ran that office as a division of Adecco subsidiary Lee Hecht Harrison until going out on his own as an independent coach in 2004. He specializes in what he calls “career transitions” for people who have lost their jobs at the executive level, mostly from the c-suite or as vice presidents.

getting up morning waking up 7 8 Surprising Rules That Will Get You The Job.. Rule #8: Avoid headhunters. Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs.

Some of his clients have been out of work for more than a year when they come to him. He pushes them until they find a new position. After three decades in the career coaching business, he’s come up with eight rules, some counter-intuitive, that he says promise to land his clients a job.

1. Stop looking for a job. 

Too many unemployed people equate looking for a job with sending out a résumé or answering an ad on a job board. “If you send out 500 résumés to friends, family and companies, nobody is going to take the time to help you,” he says. The only time you should send a résumé is when you’ve established there is a real job at a company for which you’re being considered, or a headhunter is trying to fill an open position and requests one. Instead of presenting yourself as an out-of-work job seeker, come across as a resource. Let people know you can solve problems. Approach your job hunt as a search for quality relationships. Instead hand out business cards that portray you as a consultant.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin 8 Surprising Rules That Will Get You The Job.. Rule #8: Avoid headhunters. Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs.

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

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2. Stop working on your résumé.
Important: You need to have a printed résumé but increasing numbers of employers prefer to just look at your LindedIn profile. Also many companies just want the basic facts about your career, rather than a long, carefully crafted story about you in the form of a C.V. I’m not sure I agree with Ellermeyer on this point, but I like his basic advice: Your résumé should be clean, clear, simple and no more than two pages. It makes sense to update it when you’ve made a major accomplishment, like increasing sales by 75% in your department or in journalism, writing a cover story. But you should be able to make those fixes in a few minutes. Do keep your LinkedIn LNKD +1.29% profile up to date.

3. Hold your elevator speech.
“After 20 seconds, no one can remember your elevator speech,” contends Ellermeyer. Instead, he recommends telling a story about yourself that runs for 60-90 seconds. “People remember stories,” he says. “Nobody wants to hear facts and figures.” You should come up with a short, possibly humorous moniker for yourself. Ellermeyer calls himself a “connector.” One of his clients branded himself “rent-a-CFO,” and then told a story about how he had gone from project to project over the last year, and how he had found success at each job. Other possible short-hand titles: IT Problem-Solver, Deal Finder, Resource Solution-Finder.

4. Don’t talk about yourself. 
Instead of leading a conversation with the latest news about your life, says Ellermeyer, “find out how you can serve other people.” Be inquisitive about others and when you learn about them, try to suggest a book or article they may want to read or an event they might want to attend. Many people think that networking requires that they list their accomplishments. But it can be much more effective to ask others about their interests and needs.

5. Don’t go to networking events.
Instead try hosting them yourself. Form your own breakfast group of eight or ten people. In other words, create your own network with people you hand-select. Though it’s tempting to sit at your computer and meet virtually, make the effort to get together face-to-face.

6. Take breaks.
The job search process can make us pretty emotional, especially when you go on the fifth interview and then you’re told that the firm has hired someone else. “Don’t take your downers to the outside world,” advises Ellermeyer. If you’re having a bad day, do research or catch up on email. I agree with this piece of advice but I also have to acknowledge that it can be awfully tough to keep your spirits up if you’ve been job hunting for a long time with no success. A single day off may help but you might need to seek more support from family and friends.

7. Don’t say you’re unemployed.
Instead of presenting yourself as an out-of-work executive, hand over a business card. Remember, you’re not out of work. You’re just between jobs.

8. Avoid headhunters.
Important: Headhunters only handle roughly 10% of the available jobs. Also, they’re working for companies and not for you. After you’ve made sure your résumé is in their database, move on.

 

Forbes.com  |  August 27, 2014  |  Susan Adams

http://www.forbes.com/sites/susanadams/2014/08/27/eight-surprising-rules-that-will-get-you-the-job-2/

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Strategy: 15 Business Schools With The Best Return On Investment…Comparing factors including graduates’ pre-MBA salaries, the number of years it takes to earn payback

If you’re thinking about getting your MBA, several factors may influence which schools you target: reputation, alumni network, programs offered. And, of course, the big one — cost.

College Graduate Strategy: 15 Business Schools With The Best Return On Investment...Comparing factors including graduates pre MBA salaries, the number of years it takes to earn payback

While top-tier business schools offer ample resources and invaluable alumni networks, is an elite MBA really worth the hefty price tag?

Many professionals attribute their success to their MBA, no matter how pricey the investment. In fact, three out of four graduates say they couldn’t have gotten their current jobs without this degree, according to research from the University of North Carolina’s Kenan-Flagler Business School.

UNC also broke down the return on investment of several of the best business schools, comparing factors including graduates’ pre-MBA salaries, the number of years it takes to earn payback from the MBA, and the total five-year gain post-MBA.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin Strategy: 15 Business Schools With The Best Return On Investment...Comparing factors including graduates pre MBA salaries, the number of years it takes to earn payback

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Stanford comes out on top,followed by the University of Chicago and Harvard Business School.

See the full breakdown below.

mba%20roi%20infographic Strategy: 15 Business Schools With The Best Return On Investment...Comparing factors including graduates pre MBA salaries, the number of years it takes to earn payback
Businessinsider.com  |  August 28, 2014  |  

http://www.businessinsider.com/business-schools-with-the-best-roi-2014-8

 

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Strategy: 24 Ways To Influence Even The Most Resistant People… Influencing others is how we get jobs and promotions, win negotiations, sell products, & gain notoriety.

Seduction, persuading a person to yield to your advances, isn’t used only in the pursuit of a love interest. Influencing others is how we get jobs and promotions, win negotiations, sell products, and gain notoriety. frank house of cards 2 Strategy:  24 Ways To Influence Even The Most Resistant People… Influencing others is how we get jobs and promotions, win negotiations, sell products, & gain notoriety.

Kevin Spacey plays Frank Underwood, master manipulator, in Netflix’s “House of Cards.

In “The Art of Seduction,” popular author Robert Greene explores the ruthless tactics of some of history’s greatest seducers, from Cleopatra to Casanova.

Determine what your target’s weakness is, and play to it. Find an ideal that this person is trying to realize “and hint that you can lead them to it,” Greene writes.

We’ve summarized Greene’s 24 rules of seduction below, adapting them to situations you may run into in your career:

1. Choose the right victim.

Your target may be a hiring manager, a potential client, or a boss in a position to promote you. He or she should be someone “for whom you can fill a void,” Greene says. Don’t try to get the most out of those who are too eager to please you, because they are usually looking to get something in return; instead, find those who give subtle hints, like shyness in your presence, that they are open to your influence.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

 Continue with article:

2. Create a false sense of security — approach indirectly.

If you want to network with an influential executive or potential client, for example, you risk forcing them to raise their guard if you approach them and immediately ask for something. Before making a proposal, reach out to them via a third party, or develop a neutral or friendly relationship before making it about business.

3. Send mixed signals.

Once you’ve got someone hooked, give yourself an air of mystery to keep that person’s interest. When meeting someone with a professional network that you want to access, for example, try making yourself appear intellectual and sophisticated but throw in a sarcastic comment or two that adds depth to your character.

4. Appear to be an object of desire.

In the same way that millions of people lust over the most popular celebrities, clients and customers will be drawn to the hottest companies and executives. Don’t make a fool of yourself, but don’t be humble when you’re trying to win someone over. Show off your most important connections and successes.

5. Create a need — stir anxiety and discontent.

People cannot be seduced if they’re content. Sell yourself by illustrating ways in which the other party is lacking in some respect and then reveal how you can make up for that deficiency. Perhaps you illustrate for a business the many ways in which it is wasting its money, and then how a few changes could transform the company.

6. Master the art of insinuation.

If you’re too straightforward with people you’re trying to influence, you may scare them away or even turn them against you. The best way to get people to work in your favor, Greene says, is by subtly dropping hints over time without revealing your true intentions. That way you can make your target think he or she is acting on his or her own initiative.

7. Enter their spirit.

If you’re trying to change someone’s mind and bring that person to your side, first play by his or her rules. If you want to do something like using a meeting to get a client to invest in your company further, begin by becoming a mirror, behaving as he or she behaves, and that person will open up to you.

8. Create temptation.

Determine what your target’s weakness is, and play to it. Find an ideal that this person is trying to realize “and hint that you can lead them to it,” Greene writes.

cleopatra 3 Strategy:  24 Ways To Influence Even The Most Resistant People… Influencing others is how we get jobs and promotions, win negotiations, sell products, & gain notoriety.

20th Century Fox

Elizabeth Taylor as Cleopatra in the 1963 film of the same name. The real Cleopatra was able to maintain power by seducing both Julius Caesar and Mark Antony.

9. Keep them in suspense.

The moment people think they know what to expect from you is when your hold over them is broken. Keep their interest in you with the occasional surprise.

10. Use the power of words.

If you are giving a presentation, for example, goad the audience onto your side by telling them what they want to hear. Make your argument convincing by making it enjoyable.

11. Pay attention to detail.

Entice your target by making painstaking decisions look effortless. For a job interview, pay attention to every detail of how your present yourself, down to your smartphone case in the event that you use it in their presence. Follow up with a formalized thank-you note to complete the image you’re trying to sell.

12. Poeticise your presence.

You will not win people over if you are a nagging constant in their lives. Associate yourself with enjoyable experiences so that your target misses you when you’re gone. To use the hiring example, make sure each interaction shines, but don’t overdo it by following up your thank-you note with another email or phone call the next day.

13. Disarm through strategic weakness and vulnerability.

Rather than overpower your target, set aside your ego and communicate how the other side is in a dominant position, even if it isn’t exactly true. You will not rise through the corporate hierarchy by appearing arrogant to your superiors.

14. Confuse desire and reality — the perfect illusion.

“Remember: people want to believe in the extraordinary,” Greene writes. Make whatever you’re trying to sell, whether an idea or an actual product, sound dramatic yet rooted in reality.

15. Isolate the victim.

People are most vulnerable when they are shut off from everything around them. When you are applying to a job, write and speak as if that job is the only one you ever wanted to apply for; when pitching your services, make your client feel as if he or she is the only one who matters.

16. Prove yourself.

If your target begins to become insecure and pulls back from you, demonstrate your value by going out of your way to help him or her in some way.

casanova Strategy:  24 Ways To Influence Even The Most Resistant People… Influencing others is how we get jobs and promotions, win negotiations, sell products, & gain notoriety.

Anton Raphael Mengs (1759)

Giacomo Casanova was an adventurous Italian socialite who wrote about his many affairs with women.

17. Effect a regression.

No matter what relationship you are trying to strike, whether with a boss, employer, client, or anyone else, your target will have had similar relationships that worked well for him or her. Figure out what this person liked most about these previous experiences with your predecessor and do things to evokememories of them.

18. Stir up the transgressive and taboo.

Even the most clean-cut people have a curiosity of the forbidden. You do not need to be doing anything wrong to make the other side feel as if he or she is working in a nebulous area — that can mean something as simple as hinting that a deal you are offering someone is so great that it is unprecedented and needs to be kept secret.

19. Use spiritual lures.

You run the risk of cheapening your words if they all lead to a singular goal, whether that be getting a job or selling a product. Supplement them with moral ideals that make your aim seem more important than it is. For instance, you could connect the prospect of a job with a company as the logical next step in your professional journey, or align your company’s mission with a higher purpose.

20. Mix pleasure with pain.

In a business situation, this means that you should avoid being overly polite with your target, which can have the unintended consequence of making you seem insincere and insecure. Mix complimentary language with blunt, straightforward insight.

21. Give them space.

When the other side is on your side but has become used to you, re-create interest by taking a step back and having him or her chase you. If you have been going for a promotion and get a job offer from a competitor, for example, bring it to your boss as if you are strongly considering leaving, even if you are not interested.

22. Use physical lures.

Keep your target focused on you by making yourself as attractive as possible, dressing nicely, smiling, and speaking with confidence.

23. Master the art of the bold move.

When your target has demonstrated that he or she is definitely interested in you, make a final offensive move, stating your intended goal. End with a natural, bold finish, rather than awkwardly or timidly avoiding what you really want. State outright how you would be a great fit for the company to which you’re applying; tell your client that he or she needs your services to beat the competition. 

24. Beware of the aftereffects.

Once you have succeeded in your seduction, employ variations of the above tactics to certain degrees to keep the other side from taking you for granted and making you disposable.

Businessinsider.com  |  August 27, 2014  |  

  http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-influence-anyone-2014-8#ixzz3BhBgnviM

 

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How A Creative CFO Will Save Advertising…The creative CFO needs to have the talents of a hedge-fund operator & the creativity of a tech entrepreneur.

Advertising’s legacy model is under pressure; it is prohibitive to quick decision-making and customizable workflows and is not built for the world we find ourselves in today.

Lead How A Creative CFO Will Save Advertising...The creative CFO needs to have the talents of a hedge fund operator & the creativity of a tech entrepreneur.

We’re living in what I call The Agility Era, a time when clients are beginning to forgo AOR relationships in lieu of specialized partners working on a project-by-project basis. In other words, even the biggest agencies are fighting for their revenue every day, week, quarter and year.

A good CFO not only pays for themselves, they do it quickly. A great one can have an enormous impact on your bottom line, top line and margins. It’s nearly the equivalent to winning a major new business pitch.

What that means is there is a need for a new model of doing business. Agencies are searching for a new way to pitch, create and charge for the work they’re doing. At the end of the day the traditional structure is outdated, and there are few with a better opportunity to create change in that model than the CFO – but it has to be the right one. The executive who figures out what the new, agile and successful set-up looks like will be greeted as a legend – and everyone else in the industry will copy it.

The new-breed CFO doesn’t just need to be good with numbers. There are already many who are great at managing day-to-day finances. What advertising needs are people who are scrappy, innovative and open to the idea of doing things in new and different ways.

Why Now?

One of the biggest hiring trends we’ve seen in the past 12 months has been an upswing in searches for creative chief financial officers—financial executives with ambitious visions and personalities strong enough to impact the culture of the agencies they work with. The reason is both large and simple: money. In recent years, it’s become increasingly difficult to grow business organically.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin How A Creative CFO Will Save Advertising...The creative CFO needs to have the talents of a hedge fund operator & the creativity of a tech entrepreneur.

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New business pitches are becoming rarer, and the expense of entering them can be astronomical. Perhaps even more pervasive is the procurement push, which places increasing pressure on executive teams to meet strict financial goals. Add that to the disappearance of guaranteed revenue from AOR relationships, and CEOs are beginning to realize that one of the most direct (and efficient) ways to shore up an agency is through streamlining finances and expenditures internally. A good CFO not only pays for themselves,  they do it quickly. A great one can have an enormous impact on your bottom line, top line and margins. It’s nearly the equivalent to winning a major new business pitch.

The Skills Required

Tradition says that the No. 1 quality in a good financial executive is caution. In a world dominated by excitable creatives, it makes sense that the CFO should be the voice of caution and reason in the room. But what we’re seeing in our CFO searches is that caution can actually be a detriment for the job – at least in modern advertising. The really successful CFO needs to be three things: fearless, forward-thinking and full of ideas.

Fearless, so that they can enter an existing business and really challenge the way things are being done. The executives that are going to change the world of advertising should be questioning not just the way an agency is spending its money, but also how it’s billing, who they are billing and the type of work they are looking for.

Forward-thinking, because the only way to build a new model is to start from scratch. Ten years ago, digital-centric agencies forced larger, traditional ones to re-shape themselves to meet all the creative needs of the modern clients. But the problem goes deeper than straightforward integrated thinking or building out digital capabilities. Executives should anticipate what their clients’ needs will be 12 months from now and organize their model to meet those needs now.

And full of ideas, because moving the agency model forward is about thinking in a way that hasn’t been done before. The business world is in a “disruption boom,” with startups looking to reshape everything from retail to taxis to banking. The creative CFO needs to have the talents of a hedge-fund operator and the creativity of a tech entrepreneur. Not easy – but not impossible either.

Who Will It Be?

Judging from our experience, the new breed of CFO can come from anywhere, be it a big, established agency or a small, dynamic content shop. The most innovative CFO candidates we’re meeting have a unique outlook on the overall communications industry and have the energy to drive the need to do things differently – no matter where their career was first established.

It’s not a matter of if someone cracks the problem but when. If you want to build for the future, ask your CFO – or hire one.

 

This article is by Jay Haines, CEO of global executive-search firm Grace Blue, North America.

Forbes.com  |  August 27, 2014  |  The Muse

http://www.forbes.com/sites/onmarketing/2014/08/27/how-a-creative-cfo-will-save-advertising/

 

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Safety: How To Respond If Somebody Holds A Gun To Your Head …Great Advice may Save You or Family Members !

Editor’s note: This post was originally published on Quora, in answer to the question, What should you do if someone puts a gun to your head?” We republished the answer with permission from the author,  former police officer Justin Freeman.

Gun to head Safety: How To Respond If Somebody Holds A Gun To Your Head ...Great Advice may Save You or Family Members !

The flippant (but obligatory) short answer is, “Whatever they tell you to.” Of course, within this there is nuance and some other considerations to be made:

Most important: Stay. Calm. There is no way you’re going to remember all of the stuff I’m about to say, but if you remember anything, remember to remain calm. If clarity of thought was ever important, it will be in the proceeding moments.

  • First, every point following this one will be dependent upon your remaining calm. You will be incapable of higher thought if your brain is seized up with an ‘oh my god oh my god oh my god’ cycle.
  • Second, calmness begets calmness. If you panic, you’re in turn going to panic a person with a gun to your head, who obviously felt backed into a corner prior to your beginning to scream and convulse two feet away from them.
  • Remember, your assailant has leveraged control of your physical movement by virtue of having a firearm, but you will, almost without exception, be at a psychological advantage in this situation — if you stay calm. You will have the benefit of rationality, logic, rhetoric and persuasion, all of which you’re about to need in spades.

Next, establish eye contact with the assailant. It sounds simplistic, but looking into their eyes forces them to acknowledge, if only to themselves, your humanity in this situation.

  • Think about it: Most of us would have little compunction about a mouse dying outside of our presence, but could you yourself kill it if it was looking in your eyes? It would at least introduce a degree of hesitation.
  • You don’t want this person uncontrollable, but you do want them uncomfortable. You want them to start reconsidering the necessity of what they’re doing and begin looking for an out.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce that FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013.

linkedin Safety: How To Respond If Somebody Holds A Gun To Your Head ...Great Advice may Save You or Family Members ! 

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Know your assailant: Not every gun-toting criminal is created equal.

  • There are usually very specific contexts in which you’d find yourself with a gun to your head: in the course of a robbery, in a hostage situation, or at the inception of a kidnapping.
  • Of the three, a simple robbery is probably most likely, but probability doesn’t do you much good after the fact.
  • Each will require a different response, but they have a common denominator: the point of the encounter, in the vast majority of cases, is not to kill you.
  • If the person was determined to murder you, you would already be dead — and every second that passes is usually one passing in your favor when it comes to surviving the encounter. This is why I didn’t list things like school shootings and terrorism — the whole point in those instances is to maim and kill, so you’re unlikely to spend any time with a gun to your head.

Here are some considerations for each of the above scenarios. A robber is simply using the gun to increase their chances of success and as an insurance policy — the point is still your wallet or purse. Give it to them.

  • A lot of armchair wisdom on the Internet advocates chucking your money vessel in one direction and running pell-mell in the other; I honestly wouldn’t recommend this. I think there’s an inherent assumption here that they’re going to mindlessly key on the flying money a la the dog from Up. The goal is to keep the gun wielder calm, and the sudden motion of you winding back for your wallet/purse toss isn’t going to help your cause.
  • Telegraph your actions before you do them (“I’m going to reach into my back pocket to get my wallet out now”), reach for your wallet or remove your purse at quarter speed, and calmly hand them what they’re demanding.
  • During the whole process, study the person. Instead of trying to memorize exact height and weight or every article of clothing, try to find something unique about them personally. Unless the person is exceptionally tall, short, heavy or skinny, it’s not going to do the police much good later — everybody is “about six feet” and “around 1__ pounds.” And as far as clothing goes, what he’s wearing is coming off as soon as he’s out of sight and in a protected environment.
  • Think: If you were to see five people with this person’s general features, what about them personally would distinguish them? It might be a hairstyle, scar or birthmark, tattoo, piercing pattern, or something else. This information is stored in law enforcement databases for repeat offenders, and could prove invaluable in an investigation.
  • Remember, this is the only scenario in which your assailant will be unknown, so study carefully — in the course of your compliance.

hostage taker is using you as a means to an end — simple leverage. This, contrary to media portrayals, most often won’t take the form of being a pawn in a grand bank robbery scheme. It will more often be you being gathered up as a personal hostage for get-away collateral.

  • If this is the case, police are likely already present. They probably won’t be giving you any directions, as they’ll be reasoning with your assailant, but listen carefully to what is going on.
  • Try to stay as quiet as possible. For sure don’t start screaming — you’re going to spike the stress level of both your assailant and the responding officers, which won’t be good for anybody. Try not to talk either — you’ll want your assailant to be able to hear the directions and commands of the police officers on scene.
  • There are some other issues I’d love to discuss here, but for reasons of officer safety and tactical advantage I just can’t. I will say this, though: stay as far away from your assailant’s head as you can. If you can imagine a triangle running from the outside corners of his or her eyes down to the bottom of their nasal septum (the cartilaginous wall between their nostrils), that will be the shot target should police be forced to engage with firearms. The reason is that bullets to this area have a better chance of producing an immediate kill, without even a flinch reflex, which might cause the person to pull the trigger of the gun they have to your head post-mortem. Or so I was told in Academy; I’ll grant that my instructors weren’t medical doctors.
  • If, instead of the above scenario, you’re alone with the hostage taker, you’re going to have to live off of the shirt sleeve of your common sense. The only thing I can really advise here is to talk to him or her as much as possible. Try to get them talking about something, especially what they believe in if they have some cause compelling them in the situation. Speak in measured, even tones, and defer to their intelligence and passion. Identifying with them creates a social connection they will have to overcome if they are deciding whether or not to kill you later.

kidnapping changes the metrics significantly. While vanishingly rare (I can’t even find reliable statistics for adult kidnapping/abduction in the United States), some thoughts based on some of my understandings:

  • The only time I would advise you to be fully compliant during a kidnapping at gunpoint is if someone in your family is famously wealthy, and you’re fairly assured that the situation is motivated by an extortion attempt. In this case, it is in your assailant’s best interest to preserve your well-being.
  • You’re probably not very likely to be raped during an extortion attempt, because the power play is the money, not dominating you sexually. Plus, many rapes are forensics gold mines, and they’re probably not going to trade their payday in for an unwilling score, or risk so long a prison sentence for it — forcible rape committed by means of the display of a weapon is a mandatory minimum fifteen year prison sentence in Missouri with no possibility of sentence suspension.
  • In all other cases, the outlook is probably grim, especially if a vehicle gets involved. This is purely my opinion, but it’s given as a former police officer who still has connections and an ear to the ground: if you’re a woman being forced to drive at gunpoint by a man, there’s a high probability you’re driving yourself to the scene of your own rape and/or grave.
  • If there’s any way of forestalling getting into a vehicle, I’d do it. It may be looking past his shoulder and nodding, giving him the impression there’s somebody behind him, causing him to turn long enough for you to run like hell. It may be diving through the opposite door or window when you’re forced into the car. It may be you deciding to dig in and make your stand, hoping unplanned resistance will cause him to drop the gun or to retreat.
  • If you’re ambushed in your own car or can’t help being compelled into it, I would ignore direction commands and drive briskly to a police station or the most crowded place I could find, then slow to about five miles per hour and start honking the horn. The whole point of his demands about where to go is getting to a place of solitude where his anonymity is preserved and he is in control of the situation. I can almost guarantee he has no interest in killing you at fifty miles an hour, enduring the resultant car crash, then fleeing, armed, from a car with a gunshot victim in the driver’s seat. Nor is he interested in killing you while everybody looks on in the parking lot you found. You’re giving him an out — if he stashes the gun and flees, it will look to most people like a joke or a domestic squabble.
  • Obviously none of these courses of action is ideal, but you’ve been put in a situation where you’re probably going to have to choose between bad and worse at some point. There is no ‘right’ answer, just the ‘best, considering the circumstances’ answer, and I can’t pretend to be able to make it for you in advance.

No two gunpoint situations are alike, and they will all be very dynamic situations. My advice is to remain calm, be as compliant as you can, be aware of your surroundings, and do what you need to in order to survive. But the obvious best case scenario is keeping yourself out of the situation that put you on the business end of a firearm:

  • Try not to travel on foot alone, especially if you’re a woman, and especially if you’re impaired (by alcohol or otherwise). Most criminals who get a cheap gun to commit crime are cowards, and thus need the gun to gap-fill their cowardice. If you’re with one or two others, you’re introducing too many variables into the equation for their comfort. If you’re alone, though, they know that one versus one plus a gun will usually work out in their favor.
  • If you’re on a campus of any kind (corporate or collegiate), don’t feel completely safe in getting from one place to another, and don’t have friends close, get a security escort. If the campus has no provision for this, raise holy hell until they do. If you can’t find anybody in this regard and have a genuine concern about your surroundings, don’t hesitate to call your local law enforcement agency and request an officer. You are not being a bother. You are not wasting the officer’s time. You did not pull the officer from another assignment — you’ll only be sent an available patrol officer. We’re in the public safety business, and this obviously fits nicely. Now, it may take a while to get to you, especially if we’re busy; this will admittedly be low priority, and will be shelved until active incidents have responding officers — but don’t take that to mean that you’re unimportant. I was more than happy to do this, it took about twenty seconds, and it gave me a community contact.
  • If you’re going out for a night on the town, consider wearing an outfit that’s actually comfortable, as opposed to five inch stilettos and a dress that has all the give of Saran wrap (I’m picking on the ladies — guys usually don’t need to be told to pick a comfortable wardrobe). If you’re out and about enough, there will eventually be an instance in which you will need to run. In the case of an armed criminal, it may be for your life. I could only sigh in disdain at some women I saw downtown —in the midst of an active incident or disturbance, I would see them tippy-toeing down the sidewalk in their heels, trying to shuffle their feet in four-inch steps because they were wearing what amounted to a dress-length corset. Or peeling the heels off and subjecting their assuredly tender feet to the gravel and broken glass.
  • Don’t be ostentatious. Expensive jewelry and exhibited cash are road flares for robbers and thieves – if they feel they can get a quick score, they’ll stalk you from a distance for as long as it takes until they see a window of opportunity. If you look run of the mill, they’re less likely to take the chance; doing a prison sentence for armed robbery is a steep risk if all they’re likely to get is a ten dollar watch and a credit or debit card that they know will likely be cancelled before they can even try to use it.

Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/how-to-respond-if-somebody-holds-a-gun-to-your-head-2013-12#ixzz3BWndyPZ6

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What Employees Get Wrong About Performance Reviews…Most people think of performance reviews like they’re report cards. It doesn’t work that way in the business world.

 I’ve gotten several emails lately from readers who have been disappointed or surprised during their most recent employee review. Here’s an example:

Performance Review What Employees Get Wrong About Performance Reviews...Most people think of performance reviews like theyre report cards. It doesnt work that way in the business world.

I have worked at my current place of employment for over a year and a half. At the end of my first year, I was a little discouraged and very surprised that my manager was too busy to give me a performance review. Instead, I came in one day and discovered that a pay increase of 2% had been added to my check. What did I do wrong?

Most people think of performance reviews like they’re report cards. If you do an “A” performance at your job, you get a big raise, a “B” performance, you get a smaller raise, and so forth.

It doesn’t work that way in the business world, alas. In real life, “B” and even “C” performers frequently get the bigger raises than the “A” performers.

This is because a salary increase is not a reward based on your past work; it’s an investment that your boss makes based upon:

  • How much value you’ll create in the future.

  • How likely it is that you’ll take your talents elsewhere.

Because of this, a “C” performer whose skills are in high demand usually gets a larger salary increase than an “A” performer whose skills are in low demand. Similarly, a “B” performer who looks likely to jump ship will usually get a larger salary increase than an “A” performer who seems happy and content with his or her job.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin What Employees Get Wrong About Performance Reviews...Most people think of performance reviews like theyre report cards. It doesnt work that way in the business world.

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As I explain in my book “Business Without the Bullsh*t: 49 Secrets and Shortcuts You Need to Know,” performance reviews are not report cards. They are negotiations where you and your boss come to agreement about the value of your work.

To “ace” a performance review, therefore, you must think like a negotiator. This means consistently strengthening your negotiating position during the review period and then “horse trading” for what you want. Here’s how it’s done:

1. Ask how you’ll be measured and rewarded.

At the beginning of your review period (or whenever you get a new boss) have a one-on-one meeting as soon as possible to discuss:

  • What are the expectations from my work over the review period?
  • How will my contributions be measured?
  • If I meet or exceed those metrics, what can I expect as a reward?

These are not questions that you ask of your boss and then passively accept the answers. They’re negotiations where you come to agreement on what’s right and reasonable.

For example, if the boss surfaces an expectation that’s outside your control (like an increase in stock price), try to negotiate that off the table.

Similarly, if your boss is vague about a reward, try to pin the boss down to a specific promise. For example:

Boss: Complete the ABC project by August and you’ll be in line for a promotion.

You: Assuming I do so, what’s the likelihood of the promotion on a scale of one to ten, with ten being a sure thing?

Take detailed notes on the conversation and afterward, send an “e-mail of understanding” to your boss thanking him or her for being helpful and documenting the specific commitments made on both sides.

If you fail to document the conversation, don’t be surprised if, come review time, your boss has forgotten whatever promises were made.

2. Periodically compare achievements to metrics.

Throughout the year, send update e-mails to your boss documenting how you’ve been fulfilling your side of the implicit contract in the “e-mail of understanding.” Doing this has three benefits:

  • It keeps your attention on agreed-upon metrics.
  • It keeps you from being distracted by side issues.
  • It forces your boss to explicitly state any changes in your metrics.

The third item is essential because every time your metrics change, it gives you the opportunity to renegotiate your side of the contract. At least, it signals that you should ensure that you will still receive the promised reward, even with the different metric.

3. Write your own performance review.

Most bosses hate writing performance reviews and will therefore more than willing to let you write the draft. If your boss demurs, do it anyway, but send your draft review as “inputs” to your performance review, which is much the same thing.

Either approach allows you to make the case that you’ve been fulfilling or exceeding the expectations set at the beginning of the review period. Since you’re more familiar with your work than your boss, you are naturally your own best advocate.

4. Negotiate your future contributions.

You are now ready for the performance review meeting.

Since you’ve laid the groundwork, the review of your previous year will be largely a formality. You and your boss will go over your achievements and you’ll get a pat on the back for a job well done.

Rather than jump right to your salary increase, you should first attempt to discuss what you’ll be doing in the future. You want to do this before discussing your salary increase raise because the discussion defines the value that you’ll create in the future, which is one of the criteria your boss uses to determine the size of your increase.

Even if your boss has already determined the specific amount of your raise at this point, you still want to negotiate future contributions before talking numbers because, if the amount of the increase is less than you deserve or expected, you can use the shortfall to extract further concessions.

5. Negotiate your compensation.

Ideally, your boss will offer you a salary raise that’s in the range you expect, based upon your contribution and the implicit contract that the two of you made at the beginning of the review period.

If that’s not the case, though, you’ve now surfaced a disparity between what you’ve contributed and/or been promised. To take advantage of this disparity, do the following:

Push back. Suggest that the boss revisit the amount of your salary increase. Bosses usually have discretionary power over the total amount of salary increase in that group. Don’t be fooled by statements like “we can only give employees at your grade level a 5% raise.” There is always a way for an aggressive manager to bypass corporate policies. It may not be simple, but it can be done.

Sweeten the pot. If that doesn’t work, negotiate for something else you want, like extra vacation days, a larger raise in your next review, a shorter period of time before your next review, additional perks (like attending a February conference in Hawaii) and so forth.

Immediately after your employee review, send another “email of understanding” documenting the commitments that you and your boss have made to each other. This starts the process over, ensuring that you have negotiating leverage for your next review.

When I had a corporate job, I used this technique to land double-digit raises for nearly every performance review. More important, I earned respect from my bosses, because they realized that I wasn’t going to settle for less than I deserved.


Businessinsider.com  |  August 25, 2014  |  
GEOFFREY JAMES


http://www.businessinsider.com/ace-your-performance-review-2014-8#ixzz3BUUbe7cJ

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Leadership: Can Boomers Stop The Bullying At Work?..Many older workers are in precarious job situations and know that if they speak up, they could be fired.

If you saw a young child being pushed around on the playground, chances are you would intervene. But are you equally proactive when you see bullying at work?

ToughInterviewer2 Leadership: Can Boomers Stop The Bullying At Work?..Many older workers are in precarious job situations and know that if they speak up, they could be fired.

“Boomers are among the guiltiest of the bullies,” says Gary Namie, director of the WBI. “It is our generation that revered command-and-control management style.”

While this may sound like a hypothetical question, it’s anything but. According to a 2014 surveyconducted by the Workplace Bullying Institute (WBI), 27% of Americans have been bullied at work, 21% have witnessed it and 72% of us are aware that workplace bullying happens.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin Leadership: Can Boomers Stop The Bullying At Work?..Many older workers are in precarious job situations and know that if they speak up, they could be fired.

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Real bullying involves more than just bad management and obnoxious behavior.

How Bullying Can Harm A Victim’s Health

It also means health-harming behaviors that can include verbal abuse, offensive conduct and intentional sabotage. And workplace bullying doesn’t just harm the victim. It leads to poor morale, high turnover and low productivity, which impact the entire organization.

(MOREWhat to Do When You Work for a Bully)

The problem is now so widespread that lawmakers in 15 states have introduced legislation aimed at prodding employers to take the matter seriously or face consequences. (Tennessee already has workplace bullying laws on the books, but they only apply to public sector employees.)

Why Boomers Can Be Effective

So what are you willing to do about it? I ask because many boomers are in management and as a result, some are in a good position to take action. Even if you’re not among your employer’s leadership team, you still might be able to make a difference.

If you’re well respected by colleagues, have good relations with key influencers at your employer or have strong job security, it’s likely easier for you to speak up and get management to take bullying seriously than it is for your younger co-workers.

(MORETips for Women Who Work With ‘Mean Girls’)

That is an important advantage. Just like on the playground where bigger kids target weaker ones, the majority of workplace bullying is inflicted from the top down. According to the WBI survey, 56% of it is attributed to bosses, compared to 33% that’s blamed on peers. Given this inherent power imbalance, it’s no surprise that few victims stand up to their abusers.

I want to emphasize that not every boomer is in a position to stand up to workplace bullies.

Many older workers are in precarious job situations and know that if they speak up, they could be fired. That’s especially true in environments where bully behavior is a celebrated part of the workplace culture. (Wolves of Wall Street anyone?)

Are Boomers the Guilty Party?

And let’s be honest. There are all too many boomers who are bullies themselves.

“Boomers are among the guiltiest of the bullies,” says Gary Namie, director of the WBI. “It is our generation that revered command-and-control management style.”

In fact, Namie argues that younger generations (including the boomer’s kids who were groomed on the intolerance of bullying throughout their school years) will be the ones who make bullying unacceptable sometime in the future.

That may well come to pass. But it doesn’t mean that employees in their 50s and 60s don’t have a responsibility to stand up for what is right when they can. In fact, given the role boomers have played in fostering this problem, quite the opposite.

The next time you witness bullying, consider taking the following steps to set things straight. I’ve broken them out for people in upper management and those who aren’t.

If You Are In Upper Management

Monitor peer managers for bullying actsThen, if you see any, quietly but firmly stop the abusive conduct.

Namie advises that you have a private conversation with your colleague about the destructive effect the conduct has on subordinates, coworkers and the entire organization. The message coming from a peer or a higher manager is much more effective than any dialogue the bullied target might want to initiate.

Implement a workplace bullying policy It should spell out the ramifications of workplace bullying and the impact of violations, as well as an easily-understood reporting procedure.

To be most effective, managers should get training on how to respond to reports of bullying, plus how to enforce policies and procedures. WBI offers online and in-person training options for employers interested inimplementing policies.

Stick to your guns Even the best anti-bullying policy will be a mockery if there is no follow through. When bullying occurs, you must be willing to follow the designated procedures, even if that means standing up to a valued colleague.

If You’re Not in a Leadership Position

Enlist support from upper managementNamie recommends securing assistance from a manager who is senior to the bully by at least two levels — not the bully’s immediate boss.

Get coworkers to join with you Donna Ballman, a labor attorney and author of Stand Up For Yourself Without Getting Fired, says: “You should discuss with coworkers that you are going to complain, maybe get at least one other to come with you if you can, or even put together a complaint signed by other non-supervisory coworkers.”

Help the victim find another job Sometimes the best — and only — way to assist a bullying target is to help the person find another position, either by transferring within the company or by going elsewhere. According to the WBI, in 61% of cases, bullying stops only when the target loses her or his job.

Case in point: I recently heard from a 25-year-old who was forced out of her first job by a female bully boss. She explained her situation this way: “The incompetent HR manager, who was willfully blind to the problem, allowed the bully free rein. No matter how many people complained to him, no matter how clear it was that she was a toxic presence in the office, the HR manager always claimed to need ‘just one more person’ to come forward before he could do anything. When those are the office dynamics, the only thing you can do is what my immediate boss did for me, which is help the junior worker leave the situation.”

If an internal transfer is possible and desirable, offer to make a personal introduction or recommendation to the hiring manager in another department. If a transfer isn’t feasible, make job introductions to key people in your network elsewhere; pass on information about promising leads; offer yourself as a strong reference and serve as a strategic sounding board during the search process.

Help the bullying victim keep perspective while navigating this difficult situation. It’s worth you mentioning that as stressful as a job change may be, it is almost always better than continuing to toil under a bully boss.

Nancy Collamer, M.S., is a career coach, speaker and author of Second-Act Careers: 50+ Ways to Profit From Your Passions During Semi-Retirement. Her website is MyLifestyleCareer.com; on Twitter she is @NancyCollamer.

Forbes.com  |  August 25, 2014  | Nancy Collamer

http://www.forbes.com/sites/nextavenue/2014/08/25/can-boomers-stop-the-bullying-at-work/

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Looking For A Job? Consider Working For A Non-Profit…Non-profits hire people to do all the same jobs as for-profit businesses do

Looking for a job? Don’t forget to consider working for a non-profit. These organizations offer challenging work in many different industries with the ability for employees to serve others or positively impact a cause that is near and dear to their heart. Just be sure to consider the advantages and disadvantages, so you begin your job search fully informed.

3014167 poster p are you passionate or delusional Looking For A Job? Consider Working For A Non Profit...Non profits hire people to do all the same jobs as for profit businesses do

Bottom Line: Working in the non-profit sector can be a great career alternative. Just be sure you conduct adequate research, thoroughly investigate the advantages and disadvantages, and treat the job search process as seriously and with as much formality as you would to obtain a job in the for-profit sector.

Advantages:

  • Interesting people. According to The Case Foundation, “Non-profits often get to choose between the best and the brightest candidates and to be picky about who they choose to employ. There is something to be said for working with people who have chosen to work toward a higher goal.”
  • Growth opportunities. A non-profit employee may find they get assigned to multiple projects at once. “This can lead to faster career development and more varied job responsibilities for those looking to get ahead quickly,” says The Case Foundation.
  • Meaningful work. Working for a non-profit can provide “the kind of work that you might otherwise only be able to do on your own (unpaid) time,” according to aUC Davis article. This can be especially attractive for those who have already spent several decades in their career and are looking for work more in line with their hobbies or purpose in life.
  • Different types of jobs. “Non-profits hire people to do all the same jobs as for-profit businesses do… they also have additional roles like fundraisers, grant writers, volunteer coordinators and community organizers,” states a recent U.S. News & World Report article.

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

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Disadvantages:

  • Pay. Some non-profits are able to pay competitive compensation as similar jobs in the for-profit sector, but not all can. Benefit packages or other perks might compensate for lower pay, so conduct research to ensure the compensation package is within your target range.
  • Hours worked. Alison Green sums it up nicely in her U.S. News & World Reportarticle: “For nonprofits, the goal is to have a positive effect in the world. And staff members are generally expected to share that perspective, which can sometimes translate into longer hours and pitching in wherever you’re needed to help advance the mission.” If you’re passionate about the organization’s mission, longer hours worked may not be an issue.
  • Frustrating work environment. Non-profits may not be able to afford the latest technology and getting things implemented can often require meandering through a maze of red tape and approvals. Notes The Case Foundation, “The pace of change is often slower than it is in a for-profit environment, given that so many opinions must be considered and the bottom line is not as clear.”
  • Getting hired. As I mentioned in the advantages section, non-profits are often able to choose from a large pool of the brightest candidates. This can make it difficult to obtain a job at a non-profit if you don’t treat the job search process seriously.

Bottom Line: Working in the non-profit sector can be a great career alternative. Just be sure you conduct adequate research, thoroughly investigate the advantages and disadvantages, and treat the job search process as seriously and with as much formality as you would to obtain a job in the for-profit sector.

Lisa Quastauthor of award-winning book, YOUR CAREER, YOUR WAY!.  Join me on Twitter @careerwomaninc

Forbes.com  |  August 25, 2014  |  Lisa Quast

http://www.forbes.com/sites/lisaquast/2014/08/25/looking-for-a-job-consider-working-for-a-non-profit/

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