Posts

Your #Career : 19 Terrible #LinkedIn Mistakes you’re Making…There Are Some Things you Just Shouldn’t Do on LinkedIn.

Kim Brown is an Assistant Director for Syracuse University's Career Services Department. She spends a good portion of her day looking over LinkedIn profiles for job seekers and students.

LinkedIn coffee

She makes sure candidates are putting their best foot forward on LinkedIn.  Here are the most common mistakes Brown sees job seekers make on LinkedIn.

Your profile is full of typos

Brown says she's spotted typos in company names, job titles, and even in the user's name.

Unfortunately, LinkedIn doesn't have a built-in spell checker, but your browser might. Safari, Chrome, and Firefox underline misspellings in red. Bottom line, whatever you use: Be as careful on LinkedIn as you would be with a paper resume.

 

Like this Article ?...Share It !    You now can easily enjoy/follow/share Today our Award Winning Articles/Blogs with Now Over 300K+ Growing  Participates Worldwide in our various Social Media formats below:

FSC LinkedIn Network:   www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc/en

  • Twitter: Follow us @ firstsunllc

educate/collaborate/network….Look forward to your Participation !

continue of article:

You have no picture in your profile

You have no picture in your profile

LinkedIn

Adding a picture to your LinkedIn profile can make a world of difference to a recruiter. Studies have shown that LinkedIn profiles with pictures are much more likely to get clicked on than those without.

LinkedIn says you're 14 times more likely to be viewed if you have a photo.

You have a profile picture, but it's a photo of you and your significant other (or worse)

Do not get LinkedIn and Facebook confused, says Brown.

Facebook is for personal pictures, LinkedIn is for professional ones.

Brown recalls one student who came to her, frustrated because he couldn't find a job. When she checked out his LinkedIn, she saw that he had chosen a photo of himself doing The Chicken Dance at a wedding. Oof.

Stereotypical, duck-faced selfies are another big no-no that Brown's started noticing more often.

She also says she sees a lot of people link to their Facebook profiles from their LinkedIn pages. Don't do this. It's best to keep the two profiles separate.

 

You don't have a background photo or any other visuals either

You don't have a background photo or any other visuals either

LinkedIn

You can now add a background photo to make your profile stick out, too. You should pick something that matches your brand, Brown says — for example, hers is of the SU campus — and make sure that your file is big enough that it doesn't end up looking stretched and pixelated.

LinkedIn also allows you to upload all sorts of rich media — like documents, photos, links, videos, and presentations — to your profile, and if you don't take advantage of that you're missing out.

"Your LinkedIn isn't just words anymore," Brown says. "You should really be paying attention to the visuals you can add to your profile."

 

You haven't put any thought into your profile headline

You haven't put any thought into your profile headline

LinkedIn

Brown says she sees a lot of people simply put "Student at X University" as their lead LinkedIn headline. She also sees a lot of professionals who are looking for jobs with old titles as headlines.

You have a lot of room to be descriptive in this area of your profile!

"If you're a job seeker and you have a [vague or outdated] title, I have no idea you're looking for work," says Brown.

So, it's better for a student to write that they're an "Advertising major at Syracuse University who has experience with nonprofit work" or for a job seeker to write, "Experienced advertising professional looking for a opportunities in the med-tech space." Her official job title comes in the "Experience" section of her profile.

Even people with concrete job titles should use the headline space to give more detail about what they do and are passionate about. Brown's headline, for example, reads "I help SU students and alumni to craft their career stories | Connector | Speaker | LinkedIn Trainer | CNY Promoter."

Never, never write "unemployed" — highlight what you're looking for, instead. 

 

Very Important: You're not reaching out to people through LinkedIn Groups 

You're not reaching out to people through LinkedIn Groups

LinkedIn can be a great tool for networking, but messaging a complete stranger can be awkward. Try finding people who are in a group you share in common. This helps break the ice, says Brown.

For example, if you're a Syracuse University alumnus, message a fellow Syracuse person from the Alumni Network before sending a blind InMail.

But pick and choose your recipient carefully: You're only allowed to send 15 messages a month to other group members.

 

You're not personalizing LinkedIn connection requests

You're not personalizing LinkedIn connection requests

LinkedIn

When you connect to someone for the first time on LinkedIn, don't just use the generic message option, "I'd like to add you to my professional network on LinkedIn."

Take a few moments to write something personalized, says Brown. It will make the recipient more open to your request and the message feel less spammy.

Also, never lie about how you know the person. Lying is almost a guaranteed way to kill your chances at connecting.

You're "connecting" with people from LinkedIn on your phone

You're "connecting" with people from LinkedIn on your phone

LinkedIn

LinkedIn's now has a whole suite of useful apps. The flagship lets you connect to people with a click—but you can't customize the message.

"People will say to me, 'Well, I didn't personalize my message because I couldn't on my phone,'" says Brown. "It's not an excuse. Get on your computer and connect that way."

Wiggle room: The nice thing about connecting via smartphone is that you can do it immediately after meeting someone, in which case a message isn't as important.

You also run a greater risk of typos on your phone though.

You haven't created a unique LinkedIn URL

You haven't created a unique LinkedIn URL

LinkedIn

"The head of business development for a big company contacted me, and he had his LinkedIn profile link in his signature," says Brown. "It was [Joe]-[Smith]-8346974. Who would think [all those numbers] look okay? It looks terrible. Definitely customize your URL."

To customize your LinkedIn URL, press the "Edit Profile" button. Click the gear symbol next to your URL, which will take you to a separate page where a "Your public profile URL" box will let you change the link. Try to get as close to your first and last name as possible. Avoid cutesy nicknames or usernames.

You never bothered to fill out a summary

You never bothered to fill out a summary

LinkedIn

Filling out the summary portion of your LinkedIn profile is crucial if you want to pop up in search results.

"The summary is the most important part," says Brown. "Having search terms and key words in your summary that are related to the job you're doing or want to do is going to make you more likely to be found by the recruiters and hiring managers who are searching LinkedIn for talent."

You don't "stalk responsibly" or take advantage of it when someone's checking *you* out

You don't "stalk responsibly" or take advantage of it when someone's checking *you* out

LinkedIn

Any LinkedIn user can see who's viewed their profile recently, but if you limit your public profile settings, less of your information will be revealed to the person you've checked out on LinkedIn. The trade-off: You won't see as many details about who's visiting your profile, either.

Getting insights can be super valuable, so being public is a plus. Just stalk responsibly.

"If you're job seeking and you're looking at the same person's profile 59 times in a two-week period, you should probably make yourself anonymous," says Brown. "Don't be creepy."

If you've noticed someone checking out your profile in a field or at a company that interests you, though, it can't hurt to message them to start a dialogue.

 

You haven't broken your profile out into sections

You haven't broken your profile out into sections

LinkedIn

It's not just about your summary and work experience: You can add volunteering experiences, organizations you're part of, honors you've received, projects you've worked on, and more to your LinkedIn.

A lot of profiles are just one long block of text, but breaking it into different parts makes it easier for people to scan and for you to highlight certain parts that you think are particularly important.

"Don't be afraid to play around with the order of the sections," Brown says.

For example, if you're a recent grad and your course work is more valuable than any of your previous jobs, drag the "projects" section above the "experience" section.

You list "skills" that LinkedIn doesn't recognize

You list "skills" that LinkedIn doesn't recognize

LinkedIn

Adding a bunch of skills to your profile is a good way to easily flaunt your chops and make yourself more searchable, but if you write something obscure that LinkedIn doesn't recognize, it doesn't do you much good.

When you start typing a skill on your LinkedIn profile, make sure it appears in the dropdown menu. If it doesn't, it may be spelled wrong, or it's not a frequently searched item, which won't help your resume get found by recruiters.

Stick to the thousands of skills LinkedIn already has in the system and your profile will pop up more often in search results. You can also allow people to "endorse"

You don't have (credible) recommendations

You don't have (credible) recommendations

LinkedIn

Brown says it's important to have recommendations on your LinkedIn profile. But not just any old recommendation—it should come from someone who's reputable and it should speak to your specific qualifications.

"A lot of times recommendations are really generic," says Brown. "Such as, 'Alyson would be an amazing asset to your company because she is a hard worker and a wonderful addition to our office.' Well, great. How about something more detailed, like about that time you worked on a specific project together?"

Make sure the recommendation someone writes for you isn't applicable to every other candidate.

Getting these recommendations may require asking for them. Navigate to the "Privacy and Settings" tab, then to "Profile," and you will see a link for "Manage my recommendations." That section will prompt you to send a message to a boss or coworker.

You're not posting photos, posts, or work-centric updates

You're not posting photos, posts, or work-centric updates

LinkedIn

Don't fill out your profile and then forget about LinkedIn. Radio silence on your feed is bad news.

More than ever before, the site makes it easy to keep your network up-to-date on what's going on in your professional world through updates, photos, posts, and comments.

"Make it a point to once a week do something," Brown advises. "Share an update with your network. Put up a photo of an event that you attended. Comment on someone's post. You want to show up in the network feed, and the way you show up is by doing those things."

You can solidify yourself as an expert on a topic by publishing posts, too, which often get thousands of views from professionals across LinkedIn.

You're not engaging with your network

You're not engaging with your network

LinkedIn

"The 'Keep in touch' section is a lazy networker's dream," Brown says.

Under the "Connections" tab, LinkedIn makes it dead simple to find little ways to connect with people in your network. You can see congratulate someone on a work anniversary, new job, or switching cities.

There's no excuse to feel overwhelmed by the prospect of maintaining a relationship.

You haven't left yourself helpful little reminders or scheduled reconnection nudges

You haven't left yourself helpful little reminders or scheduled reconnection nudges

LinkedIn

Every time you connect with someone new on LinkedIn, you should get into the habit of feeling out information in the "Relationship" tab that will appear on their profile.

You can add notes about their interests, info about how you met, and even reminders to reach out to them again in a week, a month, or on a recurring cycle.

"Don't worry, it's only visible to you," Brown says.

You're not exporting all your contacts

You're not exporting all your contacts

LinkedIn

Want to make it easy to take your LinkedIn conversations off the site, or make sure that you'll still have access to your contacts if you lose access to your account?

You can export all of your contacts into an Excel file with their name, job title, and email.

Go to the main Connections tab, press the gear symbol in the right-hand corner, and then click "Export LinkedIn Connections" under "Advanced Settings."

Viola! There are a bunch of different file formats you can use when exporting

"This is one of the biggest 'a-ha' moments that everybody has when I teach LinkedIn classes," Brown says.

BONUS: You're not using advanced search tools when hunting for a job

BONUS: You're not using advanced search tools when hunting for a job

This one may seem a little obvious, but if you use the advanced search tab, you're much more likely to turn up relevant career opportunities than if you just conduct broad queries.

Instead of just searching by the name of the company or person, you can search by keyword, industry, location, and more.

You can also save searches, save jobs you're interested in, and even apply, right through the site.

You're not taking advantage of the "Find alumni" option

You're not taking advantage of the "Find alumni" option

LinkedIn

Recently, LinkedIn has really amped up the way it lets you find people who went to your university.

You can see all the people who attended your college who studied a certain major or were in your year. You can even search for a specific company, and see all the alumni who worked there. This is great for networking, reconnecting, or planning reunions.

"You can use it for a ton, a ton of different purposes," Brown says. "It's like an in-depth yearbook."

Businessinsider.com | July 17, 2015 | 

 

 

Your #Career : 20 Words you Should Never Put On your #Résumé …Avoiding Overused Terms can Help #Job Seekers Convey their Message & Stand Out From the Crowd.

While Any Large Companies Use Automated Résumé Screener Software to Cut Down the Initial Pool of Job Applicants, Loading your Résumé with Meaningless Buzzwords is Not theSsmartest Way to Get Noticed. 

Woman Using Laptop at Home

Get ready to start hitting the 'delete' button.

"Nearly everyone is guilty of using buzzwords from time to time, but professionals are evaluated increasingly on their ability to communicate," says Paul McDonald, senior executive director for professional placement firm Robert Half.

One of the major problems with using buzzwords and terms, according to Mary Lorenz, a corporate communications manager at CareerBuilder, is they have become so overused that they've lost all meaning.

Another issue, she explains, is that many of these words don't differentiate the job seeker from other candidates because they're so generic. Instead, Lorenz says job seekers should speak in terms of accomplishments and show rather than tell.

"Avoiding overused terms can help job seekers convey their message and stand out from the crowd," McDonald says. Here's what you should avoid:

1. 'Best of breed'

1. 'Best of breed'

When CareerBuilder surveyed more than 2,200 hiring managers last year, it found "best of breed" to be the most irritating term to be seen on a résumé.

"Anyone can say they are 'best of breed,' a 'go-getter,' a 'hard worker,' or a 'strategic thinker,'" Lorenz says. "Employers want to know what makes the job seekers unique, and how they will add value to the specific organization for which they're applying."

 

Like this Article ?...Share It !    You now can easily enjoy/follow/share Today our Award Winning Articles/Blogs with Now Over 300K+ Growing  Participates Worldwide in our various Social Media formats below:

FSC LinkedIn Network:   www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc/en

  • Twitter: Follow us @ firstsunllc

educate/collaborate/network….Look forward to your Participation !

continue of article:

2. 'Phone'

2. 'Phone'

Career coach Eli Amdur says there is no reason to put the word "phone" in front of the actual number.

"It's pretty silly. They know it's your phone number." The same rule applies to email.

3. 'Results-driven'

"Instead of simply saying that you're results-driven, write about what you did to actually drive results — and what those results were," Lorenz suggests.

 

3. 'Responsible for'

Superfluous words like "responsible for," "oversight of," and "duties included," unnecessarily complicate and hide your experience says Alyssa Gelbard, founder and president of Résumé Strategists.

"Be direct, concise, and use active verbs to describe your accomplishments," she suggests. Instead of writing, "Responsible for training interns ...," simply write, "Train interns ..."

5. 'Highly qualified'

McDonald saying using terms like "highly qualified" or "extensive experience" won't make you seem better-suited for the job — in fact, it could have the opposite effect. Instead, he suggests you focus on the skills, accomplishments, and credentials you bring to the role.

6. 'Seasoned'

"Not only does this word conjure up images of curly fries," says Rita Friedman, a Philadelphia-based career coach, "it is well-recognized as a code word for 'much, much older.'"

 

7. 'References available by request'

This outdated phrase will unnecessarily age you, Gelbard says. "If you progress through the interviewing process, you will be asked for personal and professional references."

8. 'NYSE'

Vicky Oliver, author of "Power Sales Words" and "301 Smart Answers to Tough Interview Questions," says you should spell out any acronyms first and put the initials in parentheses. For example, "NYSE" would read "New York Stock Exchange (NYSE)."

"For starters, acronyms are capitalized, and all caps are harder to read than upper and lower case," she explains. "It's also really difficult to wade through a piece of paper that resembles alphabet soup."

 

9. 'Team player'

9. 'Team player'

TaskRabbit

"Who doesn't want to be a team player? If you’re not a team player, you’re probably not going to get the job," McDonald says.

But using this term isn't going to make you stand out from other candidates. "Instead, use an example of how you saved a company time, money, and resources on a team project or in collaboration with others.

10. 'Ambitious'

10. 'Ambitious'

"Of course you would never say you're 'lazy' either, but calling yourself ambitious doesn't make any sense on a resume," Friedman says.

"It can imply that you're targeting this job now, but will quickly be looking to move up in the company because you won't be satisfied in the role, leaving the employer stuck with doing a new job search in the very near future."

11. 'Microsoft Word'

Yea, you and everyone else.

It's assumed that you have a basic proficiency in Microsoft Office, Gelbard says. Unless you have expert proficiency, there's no need to include it on your résumé.

12. 'Interfaced'

"Words like this make you sound like an automaton," Oliver says. "Most recruiters would rather meet with a human being. Keep your verbs simpl

 

13. 'Hard worker'

13. 'Hard worker'

War Production Co-ordinating Committee

It's true that a company is less likely to consider you if you haven't worked hard or don't come across as someone who will put in what it takes to get the job done, but that doesn't mean writing "hard worker" will convince hiring managers of your efforts.

"Give concrete examples of how you’ve gone the extra mile, rather than using a non-memorable cliché," McDonald suggests.

14. 'Honest'

14. 'Honest'

Screenshot

Honesty is one of those things you have to show, not tell, Friedman says.

"It's not as if there are some other candidates out there vying for the job who are describing themselves as 'duplicitous' or 'dishonest.'"

15. 'Punctual'

15. 'Punctual'

Daniel Goodman / Business Insider

Being punctual is great, but it's also pretty basic to holding down a job. Don't waste the space on your résumé.

 

16. '@'

Unless it's in your email address, avoid casual texting language like @.

"A resume is a formal document and is often the first impression a potential employer has of you," Gelbard stresses. "Business language should be used to reinforce that first impression and text-style or casual words should be avoided."

17. 'People person'

Cliches like "people person" are impossible to prove, Oliver says, and recruiters have heard these phrases so many times they're likely to feel their eyes glaze over as soon as they see them.

18. 'Hit the ground running'

"This one is a pet peeve of mine," McDonald says. "The expression is unnecessary and doesn't add value. A recruiter isn't going to be able to place you if you're not eager to start the j

 

9. 'I'

Avoid using personal pronouns like I, me, my, we, or our, Gelbard says.

"A person reviewing your resume knows that you're talking about your skills, experience, and expertise or something related to the company for which you worked, so you don't need to include pronouns."

20. 'Successfully'

20. 'Successfully'

Dogma / Wikimedia, CC

"It's generally assumed that you were successful at whatever you are including on your resume," Gelbard says. "There is no need to say that you successfully managed a marketing campaign or successfully led annual budget planning."

 

Businessinsider.com | July 10, 2015 |  

 

Your #Career: 7 Secrets to Writing a Standout Cover Letter…Here’s what Hiring Managers are Looking for in a Cover Letter That will Set you Apart from the Rest

While it's Important to work on your Résumé and ensure it sparkles, a Cover Letter can be just as Important. This Often Overlooked Tool can Make all the Difference.

girl laptop working computer entrepreneur

                                                                                                    Address red flags, highlight achievements and state your availability.

Here's what hiring managers are looking for in a cover letter that will set you apart from the rest:

1. Give your credentials

What do you want people to know about you first and foremost during your elevator pitch? This is exactly what you should include in the first paragraph of your cover letter.

While your résumé outlines your work experience and credentials in short sentences, the next section of a cover letter should highlight your biggest accomplishments with some detail. This is an opportunity to showcase what you want to stand out on your résumé.

 

Like this Article ?...Share It !    You now can easily enjoy/follow/share Today our Award Winning Articles/Blogs with over 120K participates Worldwide in our various Social Media formats below:

FSC LinkedIn Network www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc/en

  • Twitter: Follow us @ firstsunllc

educate/collaborate/network….Look forward to your Participation !

continue of article:

2. Prove you're the best fit for the role by showing how you can help solve the employer's problem

The whole premise of getting past "gatekeepers" to be considered for an interview involves convincing them you're right for the job. Instead of showcasing why you should be considered, let your succinct accomplishments speak for themselves while showing how you can meet the company's needs.

3. Highlight distinct accomplishments

Since the purpose of a cover letter is to express your interest in the role and briefly mention why you're a fit, instead of rewriting your résumé, take this opportunity to highlight an award or achievement. For example, point out recognition within your group for exceeding sales quotas on an annual basis or jumping in to manage a team in your department in addition to your own daily responsibilities.

It doesn't have to be long; in two sentences, succinctly reference the accolade so you stand out from other cover letters in queue.

4. Address any potential red flags

If you think something may immediately catch the recruiter's eye in a negative light, politely address it. For instance, if the position you're applying to is in New York, and your résumé address reflects Chicago, a recruiter may automatically disqualify your candidacy thinking: "We won't pay for relocation, so this candidate is not a fit."

Recruiters typically appreciate when candidates are up front and address concerns before assumptions are made. This also demonstrates a sense of maturity. Say something like: "While I realize my address reflects Chicago, I intend to move to New York within the next several months at my own cost."

This will put the recruiter's mind at ease and allow him or her to consider your candidacy based on just that — your candidacy — and not location.

5. State your availability

Make sure your preferred start date is clearly stated in your cover letter. Is it immediately? Is it after giving two weeks notice? Is it within four months? Stating you're not available for four months may hinder your chances of getting the job, because hiring managers will likely want to fill the role as soon as possible.

However, keep in mind that they may be building a pipeline for an expanding department. By stating your availability up front and being clear in the beginning of the interview process, you won't waste anyone's time — including your own.

6. Be clear and accurate

During an interview, how you say things is just as important as what you're saying. The same applies to a one-dimensional piece of paper. Your cover letter should be clear, concise and free of grammatical errors!

Make sure you spell check your résumé and cover letter and give them an extra copy edit to make sure nothing was missed. In fact, have another person give them a read-through for errors.

It often takes only a few seconds for recruiters to review a cover letter. Two things always stand out: the length and grammatical or spelling errors. Take the extra time to review your cover letter and make it easy for a recruiter or hiring manager to say "yes" to your candidacy.

7. Include your contact information

This may seem basic, but there are plenty of cover letters out there with nothing more than a candidate's name. Keep all your information readily available to make it easier for the recruiter to find and get in touch with you. Include both your email address and phone number on each page of your résumé and cover letter. This shows you're detail-oriented and look forward to being contacted.

Read the original article on AOL Jobs. Copyright 2015. Follow AOL Jobs on Twitter.

http://money.usnews.com/money/blogs/outside-voices-careers/2015/06/09/5-secrets-to-savvy-cover-letters#ixzz3cqBafuLn

This Is An Ideal Resume For A Mid-Level Employee…”You can have all the experience in the world but if your resume doesn’t stand out…

Having a ton of experience under your belt doesn't necessarily mean you have an "impressive" resume.

Ideal Resume for Mid Level

Ideal Resume for Mid Level

"You can have all the experience in the world — but if your resume doesn't stand out, if you don't present that information in a well-organized manner, or if it doesn't tell your story, nobody will take the time to look at your resume closely enough to see all that experience," says Amanda Augustine, a career expert at TheLadders, an online job-matching service for professionals.

To get a clearer picture of what makes a resume stand out, we asked Augustine to create a sample of an excellent one for a mid-level professional.

While your resume may look different depending on the industry you're in, the one below should serve as a useful guide for job seekers with about 10 years of experience:

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

linkedin

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

 

Continue with article: 

What makes this an excellent resume for a mid-level professional? Augustine outlines the following reasons:

 

1. The job seeker didn't try to squeeze everything into one page.

 

"At this point in your career, you've earned the extra resume real estate," says Augustine. "Spend more space elaborating on your most recent work, assuming it's most relevant to your current job goals." Include your header at the top of the second page as well, she says, so your name and contact information are always "top of mind" for the reader.

 

2. A list of the job seeker's core competencies is featured at the top.

 

Alex's resume contains a list of his core skill sets, usually referred to as, "Areas of Expertise" or, "Core Competencies." "This list serves two purposes," she says. "One, it allows a reader to quickly scan the top portion of the resume and get a good sense of Alex's capabilities; and two, it helps Alex's resume get past the electronic gatekeepers known as Applicant Tracking Systems."

 

3. Each role is split into responsibilities and key achievements.

 

Under each job title is a short description that explains Alex's responsibilities in that particular role. "Underneath the description is a set of bullets that highlight his most noteworthy and relevant contributions," Augustine explains. "Be specific and clear when describing your accomplishments and contributions." 

 

4. Information is quantified wherever possible.

 

Include numbers whenever possible, whether you're describing the size of your budget, the number of events you helped organize, or the number of people you managed.

 

5. The job seeker used his work experience to show progression.

 

"Alex's work experience is listed in reverse-chronological order, starting with his current position," she points out. "More space is dedicated to the details of Alex's recent roles and achievements, as employers are most interested in this information and it's directly tied to his current job goals. Even when the job titles are the same, Alex is demonstrating how he's progressed in his career by taking on larger projects, bigger budgets, and more people."

 

6. The "Education" section was moved to the end of the resume.

 

Once you've been in the working world for three years, your education section should shift towards the bottom of your resume. "When you first graduate, your new degree is one of your best selling points," Augustine says. "Now that you've been in the workforce for a while, your experience and the skills you've developed should take center stage."

 

Businessinsider.com   |  August 3, 2014  |  JACQUELYN SMITH AND SKYE GOULD


http://www.businessinsider.com/excellent-resume-for-mid-level-employee-2014-8#ixzz39QLKOUii

How To Stop Playing Resume Roulette…Job seekers figure that job hunting is a numbers game, like roulette. Keep applying, with a resume, eventually the process will work & they will land a job, right? Wrong.

Too many job seekers spend hours every day scanning job boards, submitting the same resume to every opportunity that pops up. They figure that job hunting is a numbers game, like roulette. So if they just keep applying, with a resume that doesn’t limit their options, eventually the process will work and they will land a job – right?  ..... Wrong.

roulette-wheel-Getty

That strategy, which might have occasionally worked five years ago, is now obsolete. The impact of millions of job seekers recovering from the “great recession,” combined with the dramatic growth of social media, have changed recruiting. Your job-search tools must change with it.

Today employers receive an average of 250 resumes or applications for each job they post. Of these, only one in five typically land an interview, before one applicant finally gets a job offer.

Your chance of winning with a red-or-black bet in roulette or correctly choosing the outcome in a heads-or-tails coin flip, remains 50/50, no matter how many times you spin the wheel or flip the coin, assuming no other variables change. Playing resume roulette – submitting the same resume over-and-over, hoping for a different outcome – doesn’t improve the odds either. In fact, doing the same thing over and over again, hoping for a different result, is the classic definition of insanity.

Fortunately, most of us haven’t needed to job hunt often enough to become experts at it. And of course there’s no quick fix. But taking these steps to improve the odds can get you that much closer to the job you want.

Here are some ways to manage the variables and improve your odds.

Look for employee referrals. Leverage your network to find connections into target employers. Employee referrals are the major source of external hiring. Job applicants who come in this way tend to be better hires than strangers recruited from outside the organization. Some companies even offer financial incentives to staff for referrals who become successful employees. So everyone wins.

First Sun Consulting, LLC- Outplacement/Executive Coaching Services,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note,we are excited to announce thatFSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn groups in 2013. 

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

OR

Connect with us on Twitter @   firstsunllc

That simple.

 

Continue of article: 

Get picky. To make the best use of time, focus your search, your resume and your networking efforts.

Develop a list of target employers: organizations on best-employers lists; start-ups with hot technology; nonprofits doing work that is meaningful to you; or whatever meets your criteria. Use your favorite search engine to find employers that meet your requirements. Then, look on Glassdoor.com to learn how their employees rank those organizations.

Once you have a better idea of the job you want, create a powerful resume that showcases your relevant accomplishments and skills for that position. Next, harness your network to find personal connections to those jobs, with those employers.

Avoid name confusion. To avoid making “bad hires,” most employersresearch applicants online before inviting them in for an interview. They do this using the name you include on your resume or job application. So if you have a common name, you want to make sure that you aren’t confused with someone else. Adding a middle initial or middle name can help. So can linking to your website or LinkedIn profile. Unless your goal is a job as a political commentator, use a different version of your name for your political (and other) ranting – or don’t rant at all. (See “How An Online Reputation Can Hurt Your Job Hunt.”)

Develop an online presence. Unless your professional field is spying, an employer won’t be impressed if they find nothing about you when they do their online research. Instead, they may assume you are out-of-date or clueless about using the Internet – and neither is likely to be on their list of preferred attributes for new employees. “Invisible” people also face the rise of mistaken online identity, which is deadly when the person with the same name has done something that would scare off an employer. Defensive Googling is a very good practice.

Customize your resume. Because of the high volume of resumes received, most employers with over 100 employees rely on an automated tool, called an applicant tracking system or ATS, to manage that volume. These imperfect systems save employers time and paper, but they create new barriers to entry. Using the right keywords for each job becomes very important.

Customizing the resume doesn’t require hours of effort, assuming your foundation resume is effective. Often, you can focus on the top two-thirds of the first page, and leave the rest of your resume alone. Match the language used in the job description with the wording on your resume. For example, if the posted job title is “Healthcare Office Supervisor,” the resume you submit should include these exact words. If the posting indicates that the job requires “expertise with Microsoft Office,” your resume should not use the term “expertise with Microsoft applications” unless you go on to include “Microsoft Office.” (For more information, read Martin Yate’s post, “Keyword Secrets to Get Your Resume Read.”)

Fortunately, most of us haven’t needed to job hunt often enough to become experts at it. And of course there’s no quick fix. But taking these steps to improve the odds can get you that much closer to the job you want.

Forbes.com  |  June 24, 2014  |  Deborah L. Jacobs 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2014/06/24/how-to-stop-playing-resume-roulette/

 

Building a Government Services (GS) resume….GS resumes have mandated data not recommended for a commercial or private company

Working a government services (GS) job is a dream for many. Everyone is familiar with the outstanding pension and health plans, as well as vacation days as standard packages working for a federal agency or department.  What is not well known is resumes targeted for GS requisitions (job openings) are difficult to get right, with required information sought by the federal hiring managers.

WashingtonDCDawnBoyer

DawnBoyer

GS resumes have mandated data not recommended for a commercial or private company.  The following will outline what should be included in a GS resume submitted to the USAJobs.gov recruiting website for the federal government.

Type / Order / Length of Resume: GS resumes are preferred in a chronological backwards order of employment history, with the most recent first, moving backwards to approximately 15 to 20 years of history. In USAJobs, it is acceptable to have longer resumes (five, six, or seven pages) to supply the relevant information mandated.

Address: It is not recommended to provide a street address in commercial resumes (avoid potential for ID theft). A street address is mandatory in a GS resume.

While much of the next section data may be input in the ATS (Automated Tracking System) resume database fields while applying online, recruiters look for the following near the resume’s top for quicker qualification.

Clearance:  If any current security clearance, note details (level, adjudication date, and expiration). If expired, note that, also – it may make a difference.

Passport: Recruiters can’t ask, “Are you a US Citizen?” The government will hire non-US citizens. Add passport, green card, or work visa info to help them determine citizenship qualifications.

Military: Military veterans may get preferred status (points) over non-military. Note military branch and years of service.

First Sun Consulting, LLC,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .   Also note, FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on  LinkedIn Career groups in 2013.

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

That simple.

 

Continue with Article:

Geographic Preference: Indicate the city, state, or country you’re willing to work.

The following data should be provided for each employer or level/promotion: 1) Employment Dates (MM/YY), 2) Job Title, 3) Company Name, and the 4) City and State.

Salary Data: GS resumes require base salary data for the date when you left the employer (or current employer).

Hours Worked Weekly: A job applicant may have worked full-time (40 hours weekly) or part-time (<30), or had a position working 60-80 hours weekly.  This number of hours worked will reflect the actual dollar per hour when divided into the annual salary and may be taken into consideration when factoring a salary for the open requisition.

Supervisor: The GS hiring manager needs a name to call to ask for references and/or to determine if the resume is – indeed – truthful.  This is a first step for background checks.  If the direct supervisor is no longer with the company, write in a name for a current employee who may have access to personnel records to confirm past employment.

Contact Phone: The phone number requested here is actually the supervisor’s direct line, but if unsure if that supervisor is still with the company, then provide either the direct front desk number of the company (look it up on the Internet) or the direct line to the human resources offices.

Education: Hiring managers want to see the full degrees (spell them out, e.g., Bachelors of Science). If you took classes related to the job, they want to see them listed (e.g., Engineering, Architecture, Biology, Statistics).

References:  In a commercial or private resume, never provide references (you provide the list after the end of the first face-to-face interview). Recruiters look at references, and if the reference is in the same industry or type of job, the job candidate just supplied them with more candidates – competition!

A GS resume requires 3-4 references – with at least 2-3 professional references and one personal reference. The information required will be: 1) Name, 2) Company Name, 3) Job Title, 4) Direct Number, 5) Email, and 6) type (Professional or Personal).

Writing a government services resume to apply for a job within the federal government is not any harder than writing a commercial resume for the private sector. The difference is a GS resume mandates more data for determination of the job seeker’s qualifications. The sheer volume of applicants to government jobs requires more discerning data in the resume from the beginning.

 

Dawn Boyer, Ph.D., owner of D. Boyer Consulting – provides resume writing, social media management and training, business development, and human resources consulting. Contact: Dawn.Boyer@DBoyerConsulting.com or visit the website at: www.dboyerconsulting.com.

 

Number of words, including title and POC info:  ~727

 

SEO Key Words for web post:

 

applicant, Automated Tracking System (ATS), background check, candidate, citizenship, database, Dawn D. Boyer Ph.D., Education, Email, employment, federal government, work preference, Government Services (GS), hiring, history, interview, Job opening (requisition), mandatory, Military, passport, personnel, Preference, qualifications, recruiters, references, resume, salary, security clearance, supervisor, USAJobs.gov, veterans, work-visa, www.DBoyerConsulting.com

 DawnBoyer

Bio: Dawn D. Boyer, Ph.D., has been an entrepreneur and business owner 14+ years, with a successful business in Richmond (1980s), currently in her own consulting firm, and a business partner with her husband in Virginia Beach, VA.  Her background experience is 22+ years in the Human Resources field, of which 12+ years are within the Federal & Defense Contracting industry. She is the author of 50 books on the topics of business, human resources research, career search practice, women’s history, genealogy and family lineages, and quotes for motivation and self-improvement (2,000+ & 3,000+ series).  Her books can be found on Amazon.com under Dawn D. Boyer.

 

12 Ways To Make Your Resume Stand Out…merely glance at each resume before deciding whether to toss it in the “yes” or “no” pile. So, it’s imperative

For any given job opening, HR personnel and hiring managers are deluged with resumes. Since they don’t have the time or resources to interview everyone, they are always looking for ways to weed out candidates as quickly as possible.

resume-23

In fact, some merely glance at each resume before deciding whether to toss it in the "yes" or "no" pile. So, it's imperative that you make those few seconds count.

Here are 12 ways to make your resume stand out:

1. Incorporate industry keywords and buzzwords into your resume, but don’t overdo it. Use words and phrases like "accomplished," "developed," "managed," and "team player" in the natural language of the document, says Lisa Rangel, managing director of ChameleonResumes.com. “If your resume makes it through the filtering system, but it is evident to the reader that you were successful because of 'keyword stuffing,' the reader will feel you just gamed the system and will place your resume in the ‘no’ pile.”

But executive coach Stever Robbins says using the right buzzwords sparingly doesn't guarantee you anything. “You could still end up in the resume black hole if you don't have sufficient differentiation once those keywords are met,” he says.

That's why it's important to follow the next 11 steps.

2. Tailor your resume to the job. “Tune your resume to this specific role, with substantiating detail that shows why you are a great fit for the position,” says Laura Smith-Proulx, a certified executive resume writer and LinkedIn profile expert. One way to do this is by including all of your skills and experience that are relevant to the job you're applying for.

3. Use a modern, professional format. Format your resume so that it is pleasing to the eye but doesn't focus more on visuals than content. Here's an example of a nicely formatted resume.

4. Make sure it is error-free and easy to read. HR reps equate typos and errors with laziness, says Greg Faherty, a certified professional resume writer and owner of a-perfect-resume.com. Make sure it’s perfectly polished and error-free — and don’t forget to put the most important information on page one.

5. Use a header. Include a clear, hard-hitting statement at the very top of the resume that effectively defines who you are, keeping the specific position in mind, says Ann Baehr, a professional resume writer and founder of Best Resumes of New York. “Do not use an objective. Think of it like a billboard.”

Baehr says the header is a branding statement that is typically all caps going across the top of the page, usually sitting under your name and contact info.

For example:

Jane Doe

(555) 555-5555 | 123 Main Street | janedoe@email.com

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 GLOBAL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIST

 

6. Keep things professional. Don't include negative information about previous jobs or employers. Don't discuss your hobbies or personal qualities or politics. Simply stick to your career facts.

7. Include metrics. There’s no better way to demonstrate how you’ll add to the bottom line or cut costs than to show quantifiable achievements, Smith-Proulx says. “Plus, employers often assume past performance is indicative of future results.”

Faherty agrees. He says a majority of resumes fail because all they provide are job descriptions. “The HR rep knows the basic duties of your job. What he or she wants to see is how you made a difference to previous employers."

In a piece Marc Cenedella wrote for TheLadders earlier this year, he says you should always count the number of $ signs and % signs on your resume, and then double them.

"These effects can draw the recruiter’s eye to the document and make it stand out against the many black and white documents they’ve received," she says. But know that using color on your resume is more acceptable and appropriate in some industries than others.

8. Keep the reader’s needs or industry requirements front and center. You need to know what they are looking for in your candidacy. "Instead of developing your resume and then conducting a job search, it is wise to research the requirements of several opportunities to get a sense for how you should be presented in terms of branding, focus, and keywords," Baehr explains.

9. Customize your resume to tell a story. Your resume should bring the reader through your professional experiences, accomplishments, skills, and knowledge. It should show how you’ve advanced over the years, and what you can bring to the table.

“Make your resume long enough to tell your story, but short enough to skim in a single sitting," Smith-Proulx says. "The key is readability and relevance to the job you’re targeting.”

 

First Sun Consulting, LLC,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 300 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trendsemployment updates along with career branding techniques  .  Note, our FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on most LinkedIn groups in 2013.

linkedin

Simply connect @  http://www.linkedin.com/in/frankfsc  , then click, ‘Add Frank Link’  to your Network.

That simple.

 

Continue of article: 

10. Don't overuse fancy fonts and colors. "While you don’t want to overdo it, you can use color in a conservative manner to make your resume visually differentiated from the sea of documents the recruiter will review," Rangel says. For example, a subtle navy blue border can be very effective.

"These effects can draw the recruiter’s eye to the document and make it stand out against the many black and white documents they’ve received," she says. But know that using color on your resume is more acceptable and appropriate in some industries than others.

11. Make it longer than one page if it needs to be. Use the appropriate amount of space for your experience. “If you’ve been in the workforce for 15-plus years, do not feel forced to trim information about your achievements to keep to an arbitrary one-page resume rule,” Rangel says. Use what you need to, but do not make it unnecessarily long.

12. Supplement your resume with a cover letter. About half of all HR reps say they won't even read a resume if the candidate hasn’t submitted a cover letter. So, unless the employer explicitly says they don’t want a cover letter, write one.
Businessinsider.com |  April 2, 2014 |  
http://www.businessinsider.com/12-ways-to-make-your-resume-stand-out-2014-4#ixzz2xolhpKSw

Four and a half inches and six seconds….Many resume writers are so focused on cramming every detail of what they have done into a resume and using ‘older standards’ for job searching, they hurt their chances of being seen by the hiring manager.

This is the average amount of time and the space at the top of a resume read by the average recruiter to scan a resume for qualified candidates. And, that is after they obtain the resume that has made it through the pre-qualification online recruiting software system. Many resume writers are so focused on cramming every detail of what they have done into a resume and using ‘older standards’ for job searching, they hurt their chances of being seen by the hiring manager. 

0218_land-interview-resume_650x4551-300x210 (1)

Resumes are supposed to be ‘teasers’ and a ‘synopsis’ of achievements that give recruiters and headhunters an idea of the job seeker’s capabilities.  If the resume covers everything, there is no need to interview an applicant if everything is already in the resume.

The resume should have unique elements in the top four and a half inches of text and keep it as simple as possible to use the white space for easier readability.

Below  are  the eight(8) elements:

Name – make sure your first name, middle initial, and last name are on the top line, but do not add the Jr., Sr., III, Ph.D., P.E., or other identifiers – this may gum up the parsing engine’s ability to cleanly fill in the fields in the online recruiting software.

Many resume writers are so focused on cramming every detail of what they have done into a resume and using ‘older standards’ for job searching, they hurt their chances of being seen by the hiring manager.

Address – keep it to the city, state, and zip code only.  Otherwise, your employment history and the street address may open you to identity theft when someone goes through your garbage can on the street to search for birthdates and social security or banking records.

Point of Contact Data – should be one phone number (not work – ethics issues; not home – backward research provides street address); one email address, and if you have a LinkedIn URL, don’t put it here, the software may confuse it as an email address.

First Sun Consulting, LLC,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 200 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trends, employment updates along with career branding techniques  .  Note, our FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on most LinkedIn groups in 2013.   In the meantime,  take less than a minute to visit our quick video below:

                                    

                                    "who we are.... what we do"

Thanks again, and as always we welcome both your comments and suggestions.

Social Media Team Members, First Sun Consulting, LLC  - www.firstsun.com

p.s.  Like these articles ?? ….  Follow us on Twitter @ firstsunllc

 

 Continue of Article: 

Objective – should be one line, not a paragraph.  The information in that one line should simply be the job title the applicant is seeking with their new employer.  Large summary of experience paragraphs waste recruiters’ time and wear out their patience, because they are mostly subjective in information.

Summary of Experience – this is vital when applying for government services (GS) jobs or government contracting (private industry) positions; and it helps recruiters in commercial industry quickly add up the years of experience for general work history. This bulleted list should be short and concise (e.g., XX years, Customer Service, Food Industry; XX years, Recruiting, Retail Industry; XX years, Marketing, Health Care Industry).

If you are aiming for a position in the federal (government) or federal contracting industry, there are three bullets that are important to add just before your chronological of employment history (backwards order).  These bullets are required information, which helps the recruiter avoid asking illegal questions.

Security Clearance – whether you have one now or it has expired, noting it will indicate you have been background checked are most likely able to obtain or keep it as a trustworthy individual.

Passport Information – company representatives are not allowed to ask if a job seeker is a US Citizen, but if you provide the information in the resume, it avoids the awkward dancing around the subject, and if not a citizen, it can provide green card status and work permit information.

Work Location Preference – tells where you are willing and able to work, also avoiding having to ask the question, ‘Are you willing to move to this location to work – by the way, the company has no relocation funding.’ If you are in the process of moving to a new location, note that in the resume, which may expand your job considerations.

Planning carefully to ensure your resume has the most concise, and appropriate, but also streamlined set of information will open up more potential for recruiters to read further. Alternatively having exact information avoids wasting your time and theirs when the employment and job factors are not a match.  Nothing is more frustrating when a recruiter believes they have a perfect match, then finds out the applicant doesn’t want to move, or needs a work permit that may require months to obtain.  Keeping the information to a minimum at the top of the resume makes it easier and quicker to read.

 

Dawn Boyer, Ph.D., owner of D. Boyer Consulting – provides resume writing, social media management and training, business development, and human resources consulting. Reach her at: Dawn.Boyer@DBoyerConsulting.com or http://dboyerconsulting.com.

Number of words, including title and POC info:  ~729/730

 

Bio: Dawn D. Boyer, Ph.D., has been an entrepreneur and business owner 14+ years, with a successful business in Richmond (1980s), currently in her own consulting firm, and a business partner with her husband in Virginia Beach, VA.  Her background experience is 22+ years in the Human Resources field, of which 12+ years are within the Federal & Defense Contracting industry. She is the author of 50 books on the topics of business, human resources research, woman’s studies, career search practices, genealogy and family lineages, and quotes for motivation and self-improvement (2,000+ and 3,000+ series).  Her books can be found on Amazon.com under Dawn D. Boyer.

 

 

SEO Key Words for web post:

 

ability, achievements, applicant, chronological order, commercial industry, customer service, database parsing, Dawn D. Boyer Ph.D., employer, employment history, ethics, government contracting, Government Services (GS), headhunters, interview, job candidates, experience, job seeker, LinkedIn, marketing, online job application, passport, qualified candidate, readability, recruiter, recruiting, resume, search engine, security clearance, summary, synopsis, U.S. citizen, work experience, work history, work permit, www.DBoyerConsulting.com

Here’s How A CEO Evaluates Job Candidates On Social Media…The bottom line: Think carefully about all of your social media profiles and what they might say about you.

What you do on Facebook may be more influential to your job search than what you say on your resume, according to Shon Burton, founder and CEO of jobs platform HiringSolved.   Burton says he breaks social media profiles into the three types of information they can reveal about a candidate: contact details, location details, and insight into hobbies and interests. He thinks the complete picture offered by social media is much better at sizing up a candidate than the traditional resume and cover letter combination.

girl-typing-on-computer-5

"Resumes are dense, often unreadable, and ignorable," Burton tells Business Insider. "Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter, yes, but also YouTube, Instagram, Tumblr, Pinterest, Spotify and others — these are the places you see a candidate’s real interests at work, as well as their abilities in motion."

First Sun Consulting, LLC,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 200 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trends, employment updates along with career branding techniques  .  Note, our FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on most LinkedIn groups in 2013.   In the meantime,  take less than a minute to visit our quick video below:

                                   

                      "who we are.... what we do"

Thanks again, and as always we welcome both your comments and suggestions.

First Sun Consulting, LLC - www.firstsun.com

p.s.  Follow our Career/Management articles on Twitter @ firstsunllc

 

Article:

The first category of social media — communication sites — includes Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. These profiles help recruiters or hiring managers contact and communicate with potential employees in a way they never could previously.

The second is location-tracking sites like Yelp and Foursquare. These help recruiters pinpoint where you are and where you've traveled, potentially confirming your location and also revealing where you spend your time.

Finally, insight platforms may include LinkedIn and Facebook, as well as Quora and GitHub. These types of social media sites help employers get a sense of what you know about and what you're interested in learning. Especially in this last category, having a profile that reflects professionalism and a clear interest in your chosen field can make or break a job opportunity.

"Today it's much harder to get hired as a software engineer at Google or Apple or Twitter if you haven't been sharing your work on a site like GitHub," Burton explains. "That's a huge change from five years ago. Hiring managers will literally say, 'No GitHub? What's wrong with this picture?'"

The bottom line: Think carefully about all of your social media profiles and what they might say about you.

Businessinder.com |  February 24, 2014  |   

 
http://www.businessinsider.com/shon-burton-of-hiringsolved-on-social-media-2014-2#ixzz2uKZIdn6g

LinkedIn is not the ONLY vital social media platform for job searches…job seeker needs to cover all the bases, ensure their resume is branded in more than job boards& multiple popular social media platforms.

Lately, many collegiate level courses teaching Internet, business office software packages, and general computer technology has included a unit on LinkedIn and resume writing to enable students to job search.  Many tech-based recruiters are also searching for unique places to find job candidates.  This means the 21st Century job seeker needs to cover all the bases, and ensure their resume or curriculum vitae is branded in more than job boards, but also in multiple popular social media platforms.

linkedin2

First Sun Consulting, LLC,  is proud to provide one of our ‘FSC Career Blog’ article below.  Over 200 current articles like these are on our website in our FSC Career Blog section with new management trends, employment updates along with career branding techniques  .  Note, our FSC Career Blog was voted the ‘most viewed’ on most LinkedIn groups in 2013.   In the meantime,  take less than a minute to visit our quick video below:

                                     

                 "who we are.... what we do"

Thanks again, and as always we welcome both your comments and suggestions.

First Sun Consulting, LLC - www.firstsun.com

 

 Article:

LinkedIn is vital for job seekers, as well as business developers, as a method of branding oneself as a ‘Subject Matter Expert’ in one’s industry or field within a B2B platform.  The addition of the social media section to profiles, to upload documents (docs, spreadsheets, presentations, and links to videos), quadruples the enrichment of the profile and enables demonstrations of job candidate capabilities to recruiters.

 

Facebook is primarily considered a B2C platform, and exposes a profile to family, friends, and acquaintances.  A job seeker could use this platform to increase their Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Privatize your personal page to ‘friends only’ viewing, and then create a ‘business page’ for a career search.  There are plenty of fields to complete for the ‘about’ section, point of contact information, availability, and a short resume pasted into the ‘more about’ box. Many recruiters perform searches for job titles, key words, gender, employers, and schools (and is comparable to LinkedIn’s powerful search engine).

 

Twitter is a severely underutilized source for job searches. Using vital key skill words as a teaser within a 140-character profile – can get you noticed. Recruiters are now tweet new job posting URLs immediately after upload a new job description to websites. They search within Twitter for profiles with key words to tweet the job announcements directly to potential candidates. Following recruiter’s or searching for job openings via Twitter can get you ahead of the competition.

 

Searching within Twitter for key search words, such as: job openings, recruiting, job opportunity, or the job title itself, will bring up hundreds of ‘freshly’ posted announcements. It’s productive to start following as many recruiters as possible when looking for new career positions.

 

WordPress (WP) blogs are an opportunity to post your resume on the Internet for the universe to see. Posting a ‘page’ and a ‘post’ within a free WP blog improves SEO for the job seeker’s skills. The key to posting within a blog and getting noticed is to use ‘tags’ feature to post key skill words for the recruiter’s Boolean searches. WordPress is only one available blogging platform. Other blogging sites are available and free; the more you use, the higher the odds you will get noticed.

 

Pinterest is the newest and most popular social media platform, and you can create bulletin board ‘pins’ (use your headshot, or a screen capture of something related to your field or industry) with a back-link to your online resume (blog, LinkedIn profile, Facebook professional page).  This primarily increases SEO, but your key skills, a headshot, and a back-link improves odds of being caught in a Google search.

 

Google+ is an important social media platform for recruiters, including providing job seekers the capability to build a personal profile that showcases capabilities, as well past employers (with job descriptions), and developing a rich profile. Many recruiters now search directly within Google+ for job candidates, using key words such as ‘resume’ or ‘curriculum vitae.’  Job seekers need to have a Google+ account!

 

Craig’s list might not be considered a social media per se, but it’s amazing how many employers search for job candidates within this platform. Post your resume to get the SEO for vital key skill words, and remember to refresh the post every 30 days.

 

If you are capable of creating profiles on social media, and loading files and photos, then it is important to use these available, and free, public relations tools in your career search. If you don’t have the computer skills to create profiles and post resumes or career information, then look for a social media manager who does have the skills to get you noticed ‘on the net’ for that next career position.

DawnBoyer

Dawn Boyer, Ph.D., owner of D. Boyer Consulting – provides resume writing, social media management and training, business development, and human resources consulting. Reach her at: Dawn.Boyer@DBoyerConsulting.com or http://dboyerconsulting.com.

 

Number of words, including title and POC info:  ~730

 

SEO Key Words for web post: announcements, B2B, B2C, back-link, blogging, Boolean, branding, bulletin, capability, competition, Craig’s List , Curriculum vitae, employers, Facebook, Google+, industry, job candidate, job search, key skill words, LinkedIn, Pinterest, platform, profile, recruiters, resume, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), Social Media, technology, Twitter, websites, WordPress (WP)

 

Bio:

Dawn D. Boyer, Ph.D., has been an entrepreneur and business owner 14+ years, with a successful business in Richmond (1980s), currently in her own consulting firm, and a business partner with her husband in Virginia Beach, VA.  Her background experience is 22+ years in the Human Resources field, of which 12+ years are within the Federal & Defense Contracting industry. She is the author of 46 books on the topics of business, human resources research, career search practice, genealogy and family lineages, and quotes for motivation and self-improvement (2,000+ & 3,000+ series).  Her books can be found on Amazon.com under Dawn D. Boyer.